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Full text of "Annual report of the Town of Andover"

1 991 



ANNUAL REPORT 



FOR THE 



TO WN OF AN D O VER 



January 1, 1991 Through 
December 31, 1991 



Prepared by the 
Town Manager 



PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF CHAPTER 40, 
SECTION 49 OF THE GENERAL LAWS OF THE 
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS AND ARTICLE U\ 
SECTION FOUR OF THE BYLAWS OF THE 
TOWN OF ANDOVER 



FOR REFERENCE 



Do Not Take From This Room 




To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of Andoven 

The public spirit in Massachusetts which led to the opening battles 
of the Revolution was nurtured and promoted in large measure by the 
deliberations and votes in the various town meetings." 

• Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court 
1918 

Public spirit was alive in the Town of Andover during 1991 as witnessed by a lively election for the Board of 
Selectmen and School Committee, an all-time record attendance at the Annual Town Meeting, and an unsuccessful 
Proposition 2V4 override for the school budget. 

Public spirit was evidenced at the Annual Town Meeting where 2,038 voters attended the first day of the meeting 
on April 1, 1991 making it the largest Annual Town Meeting in the history of the Town. At that meeting, Town meeting 
members deliberated and voted to appropriate $53,996,551 for the operation of the Town's departments and public schools. 
They also approved a $1 5M override for Proposition 2V4 for the school department contingent upon a successful Special 
Town Election. A Capital Improvement Program bylaw was adopted along with a Water Conservation Committee. 

At the Special Town Election held on May 6, 1991, the voters rejected the $1.5M Proposition 2!£ override for the 
school department by a vote of 2,826 in favor and 5,31 1 against. 

On September 30, 1991, a Special Town Meeting was held to reduce the FY 1992 budget appropriation by $670,000 
because of a reduction in local aid from the Commonwealth. The reductions came from various line items within the Town 
and School budgets as well as fixed costs. 

1991 witnessed many highlights. The ones noted below are of particular interest: 

Alfred L Daniels retired after eighteen years as Town Counsel. He was replaced by Thomas J. Urbelis of the Boston 
law firm of Hovey, Urbelis, Field steel & Bailin. 

The Selectmen initiated the Towards the 21st Century" program which is a citizen participation process that will 
determine the vision and mission of the Town of Andover for years to come. 

The Boards of Selectmen of Andover and North Reading signed a 20-year intermunicipal agreement that will permit 
Andover to sell up to 1.5 million gallons of water per day to North Reading. 

A Central Business District Committee was appointed to promote downtown Andover business concerns. Students 
from Merrimack College conducted a market research survey and analysis of the downtown retail area. 

Annual Town Meeting instructed the Town to keep the library open on Sunday afternoons. A transfer of funds by 
the Special Town Meeting in September and a transfer of funds by the Finance Committee enabled Sunday openings 
from October to June. 

The Ballardvale Branch Library was closed in June. This marked the end of an era of Andover as a small town. 



The Patriotic Holiday Committee brought the Mt. Rushmore flag to Andover and coordinated the ceremony on May 
5, 1991. 

$16.M expansion of the Water Treatment Plant in May dedicated in honor of Robert E. McQuade, Andover's 
Department of Public Works Director. 

Hurricane Bob hit Andover on Monday, August 19, 1991 causing fallen trees, drainage problems and power outages. 
The Emergency Management Team (Department of Public Works, Department of Municipal Maintenance, Police and 
Fire Departments) was activated to respond to the emergency. 

Two automatic Heart/Start defibrillators were purchased by the Andover Fire Department and placed on each of the 
two responding ambulances. In addition, as a result of the Firefighters' Union solicitations, Raytheon Company 
donated $4,300 to purchase a third defibrillator which was placed on an Engine Company. 

A Police/Fire computer-aided dispatch system was installed in the Public Safety Center and the Fire Department 
substations. The system that serves the Police Department has been operational since April. The Fire Department's 
system will be operational in early 1992. 

The Board of Selectmen voted to keep the tax factor at 120% for FY-1992. The tax rate was set at $13.26 for 
residential property and open space and $17.37 for commercial, industrial and personal property. 

Ken Newcomb retired from the Department of Public Works, Highway Division, in July 1991 and passed away in 
August. A new flag pole was erected at the highway garage in his name. 

In 1918 the Supreme Judicial Court wrote about town meetings nurturing and promoting the debate which led to 
the beginning of our Revolutionary War in 1776. Today in Andover, our town meetings provide the environment for 
discussion and debate on the Town's finances, land use and development issues, and matters relating to social interaction. 
Andover has the long-standing tradition of public spirited Town Meetings where issues and ideas are nurtured and promoted 
by thoughtful deliberation and debate. 

Much was accomplished in 1991 thanks to the cooperation and teamwork shown by the Board of Selectmen, 
department heads, employees, and citizens. The quality of Andover's public services are unparalleled because of the hard 
work and cooperation of the elected and appointed town officials and members of our community who attend Town Meetings 
and participate in Town events. Please continue this tradition of participation by voting at the Annual Town Election on 
Monday, March 23, 1992 and the Annual Town Meeting scheduled for April 13, 14 and 15, 1992. 

Respectfully submitted, 




Reginald S. Stapczynski 
Town Manager 







To the Citizens of Andover: 

This was a trying year for local officials throughout the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Reductions in funding 
by the Commonwealth, but increased costs to cities and towns as a result of prior contracts, pensions and, above all, health 
insurance costs, brought a major financial problem to the Town of Andover. It required a Special Town Meeting in 
September to reduce the already approved budget to operate the Town and schools. 

Despite these problems, some significant things happened. The Robert E. McQuade Water Treatment Plant was 
dedicated on May 6, 1991 with an event that featured Lt. Governor Paul Ceilucci. This $16.M expansion of the plant was 
a major undertaking. The plant meets our future water demands as well as the federal and state safe drinking water 
requirements. 

Several roads were rebuilt although the infrastructure is still foremost in our minds and an important part of the 
Capital Improvement Program that the Board approved in December. 

Traffic signal Installations have already improved some major intersections which we hope will prevent serious 
accidents; High and Haverhill Streets, and Lowell Street and Haggetts Pond Road. Improvements to Elm Square, 
Shawsheen Square and Frontage Road were reviewed by the Board and are planned for either FY- 1992 or FY- 1993. 

In the area of Public Safety, there was increased training and improvement to the communications system. Through 
the initiative of members of the Firefighter's Union, a Heart/Start defibrillator was donated by Raytheon and two additional 
units were purchased by the Town. 

The Central Business District Committee met during the year and, with the help of Merrimack College, did a market 
survey of our downtown. They are continuing to meet and provide recommendations to the Board of Selectmen. 

As of this date, the Board has had three meetings in the community to talk about the future of Andover in the 21st 
Century. We are also co-sponsoring an essay contest with the Andover Townsman on the same topic. 

The Memorial Hall Library has remained open on Sunday as a result of a vote taken at the Annual Town Meeting. 

This report would not be complete without a special thank you" to Marshall's for sponsoring our 4th of July fireworks 
and to the many citizens and companies who also helped to make it a wonderful evening. 

Long before the year 2000, Andover faces many immediate questions. The following are just a few: the need to 
improve our infrastructure, find new school space, recreation, conservation of open spaces, a Public Safety Center and a 
Senior Citizens Center. Above all, we must find a way to continue to provide the services that the residents of the Town of 
Andover want at a price we can afford. This will be our goal for the nineties. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Gerald H. Silverman 
Chairman, Board of Selectmen 



TOWN CLERK 



During 1991 the Town held an Annual and Special Town Election and an Annual and Special Town Meeting. At the 
Annual Town Election, 4,990 voters cast ballots for various Town Offices. On April 1 , 1 991 , the first night of the Annual Town 
Meeting, checklists showed that 2,038 voters were admitted to the meeting making it one the of the largest Town Meetings 
in the history of the Town. A Special Town Election was held on May 6, 1991 and voters defeated the Town's first 
Proposition 2 1 /2 override question that would have allowed the Town to assess an additional $1 ,500,000 in real estate taxes 
and personal property taxes to be used by the School Department for fiscal year 1992. 

At the conclusion of 1 991 , there were a total of 1 7, 063 registered voters in the Town of Andover divided among eight 
precincts as follows: 






1 -1782 


3-2085 


5-2302 


7-2231 


2 - 2125 


4-2215 


6-2158 


8-2165 



The following are statistical and financial reports for the period of January 1, 1991 through December 31, 1991: 

TOTAL 



Births Recorded: Males - 122 Females - 


113 


235 


Marriages Recorded: 




194 


Deaths Recorded: Males • 82 Females 


- 108 


190 


Dog Licenses Sold: 




1709 


Fishing and Hunting Licenses Sold: 




713 


MONIES COLLECTED: 






Marriage Licenses 


$ 


2,965.00 


Certified Copies 




7,965.00 


Uniform Commercial Code Rings 




5.008.00 


Miscellaneous Licenses Income 




13,878.34 


Liquor Licenses Income 




101.175.00 


Business Certificate Filings 




3,858.00 


Miscellaneous Income (Street Lists, Maps, etc.) 




7,492.43 


Dog Licenses 




7,090.00 


Non Criminal Violations 




725.00 


Fishing and Hunting Licenses 




13.066.90* 



TOTAL $163,223.67 

* $12,710.25 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Game - $356.65 was retained by the Town of Andover. 




FINANCE DEPARTMENT 

The Town Manager's recommended fiscal year 1992 budget was released on January 18, 1991 . During the months 
of January, February and March, approximately twenty meetings were held with the Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee 
and department heads to review budget and warrant article requests and prepare recommendations for the Annual Town 
Meeting. 

In late March, the Finance Committee Report was mailed to over 1 1 ,000 households. The Annual Town Meeting was 
held on April 1, 1991 and the fiscal year 1992 budget (Article 4) was adopted in the amount of $53,996,551. This budget 
was a decrease of 1.4% from the fiscal year 1991 budget of $54,789,994. 

Following final enactment of the state budget and a reduction of state aid to local governments, the Town received 
its state aid figures on July 23, 1991. The so-called Cherry Sheet (state aid and assessments) was $669,346 less than the 
budget approved on April 1 . A Special Town Meeting was held on September 30 to reduce the budget because of state aid 
reductions. In addition, two other financial articles were voted upon: a $130,874 reduction in the sewer budget because of 
a reduction in Andover's assessment of its share of costs for the Greater Lawrence Sanitary District, and a transfer of funds 
within the library budget to allow for Sunday openings. 

In November, the Board of Selectmen held its tax classification public hearing upon completion of the revaluation 
of property by the Board of Assessors. The Board of Selectmen voted to keep the tax factor at 120% for fiscal year 1992. 

The Andover Cable Advisory Committee met monthly to discuss any matters involving Heritage Cablevision and its 
service to Andover customers. 

Other significant activities during 1991 in the six Finance Divisions are listed below: 

FINANCE ADMINISTRATION 

• Worked with the Town Manager on preparation of 5-Year Capital Improvement Program. 

• Re-bid health insurance stop-loss coverage for premium savings. 

COLLECTOR-TREASURER 

• Implemented "personal touch" communication with delinquent property tax owners. 

• Provided taxpayers with the convenience of a pre-addressed return envelope in conjunction with the Town's lock-box 
system. 

• Worked with Data Processing to computerize tax lien certificates. 

• Converted parking ticket computer system to in-house/service bureau combination. 

ASSESSING 

• Completed revaluation of all properties and held hearings at taxpayer's request for valuation appeals. 

CENTRAL PURCHASING 

• Re-bid insurance program which resulted in savings. 

DATA PROCESSING 

• Barbara Botsch retired as Data Processing Manager. Over her 32 years of dedicated services she brought Andover 
into the forefront of computerization. The department welcomed Barbara Morache as the new Data Processing 
Manager and Mary Jane Burwell as Assistant Programmer. 

VETERANS SERVICES 

• Brought the Mt. Rushmore flag to Andover and coordinated the ceremony. 



TAX RATE RECAPITULATION 

' * • AMOUNT TO BE RAISED * ' ' 
Appropriations 

Other Local Expenditures: 
Tax Title Purposes 
Final Court Judgements 
Overlay Deficits 
Revenue Offsets/Cherry Sheet 
Revenue/Other Deficits 
Total Local Expenditures 

State and County Charges 
Overlay Reserve for Abatements 

TOTAL TO BE RAISED 


ACTUAL 
FY1990 


ACTUAL 
FY1991 


ACTUAL 
FY1992 


52.909,066 

15,325 

183,552 



82,981 

1,720 

283,578 

767,498 
499,566 

54,459,708 


54,852.093 

24,600 



161.617 

73,736 



259.953 

901,683 
713,315 

56,727,044 


53,196,677 

25,000 
40,156 

529.416 

62,860 



657,432 

941,683 
704,669 

55.500,461 


"EST. RECEIPTS & OTHER REVENUE* * 

Estimated Receipts from State: 

Cherry Sheet Estimated Receipts 
Cherry Sheet Estimated Charges 
Total from State 

Estimated Local Receipts: 
Local Estimated Receipts 
Offset Receipts 
Total Local Receipts 

Free Cash and Other Revenue: 
Free Cash - Articles 
Other Available Funds 
Revenue Sharing 
Total Other Appropriations 

Free Cash - Operating Budget 

TOTAL ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 


4,986,307 

3,571 

4,989,878 

8.862,000 

2.425.174 

11,287,174 

379,697 

469,021 



848.718 

420,000 

17,545,770 


4,615.768 

14.430 

4.630,198 

1 1 ,454,500 

458.684 

11.913.184 

62.099 

395.546 



457.645 

670.000 

17,671,027 


2,979,927 

5.128 

2,985.055 

11,134,111 

513,462 

11,647,573 

1.000 

287.031 



288.031 



14,920,659 






TOTAL TAXES LEVIED ON PROPERTY 



36.913.938 39.056.017 40.579,802 



TOTAL VALUATION (IN THOUSANDS) 


3.283.609 


3.115.574 


2.803,016 


RESIDENTIAL TAX RATE 


10.40 


11.42 


13.26 


COMMERCIAL TAX RATE 


12.92 


15.04 


17.37 


INDUSTRIAL TAX RATE 


12.92 


15.04 


17.37 


PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX RATE 


12.92 


15.04 


17.37 


EQUALIZED TAX RATE 


11.24 


12.54 


14.48 





ACTUAL 


ACTUAL 


ACTUAL 


WHERE REVENUES COME FROM 


FY1990 


FY1991 


FY1992 


STATE AID 


9.16% 


8.16% 


5.38% 


LOCAL REVENUE 


20.73% 


21.00% 


20.99% 


OTHER FUNDS 


1.56% 


0.81% 


0.52% 


FREE CASH 


0.77% 


1.18% 


0.00% 


PROPERTY TAXES 


67.78% 


68.85% 


73.12% 


100.00% 


100.00% 


100.00% 



CENTRAL PURCHASING 

During 1 991 1 ,81 7 orders were processed for the Town Government and 3,111 orders were processed for the School 
Department. Approximately thirty-eight bid openings and request for proposals were held. There were 3,935 requests for 
payment processed for the Town Government. The continued use of State Bids and contracts has proved to be beneficial 
to the taxpayers of Andover. 

Under the Massachusetts General Laws, two or more political subdivisions may jointly purchase a single item or a 
wide range of goods and services such as: paper products for copy machines, police vehicles, road salt, chemicals, fuel 
oils, vehicle fuels and supplies. 

Some examples of major bid openings conducted by Central Purchasing in 1991 are: 

Finance Committee Report Road Salt 

Highway Department Equipment Surface Water Drainage 

Sidewalks Sewers 

Miscellaneous Road Materials Water Mains 

Vehicle Fuels (gas & diesel fuel) Water Meters 

Painting of Road Markings Insurance - Town/School 

School Lunch (7 items) Office Supplies, Equipment 

and Furniture 

The office of Central Purchasing is responsible for contract compliance regarding Andover's Affirmative Action Plan 
and insurance coordination and risk management for all Town and School Departments with the exception of health and 
personal insurance which are handled by the Central Personnel Office. The Safety Committee (members represent all Town 
and School Departments) meets monthly to review safety conditions and analyze safety problems. 

HIGHUGHTS 

• From July 2, 1991 to December 1, 1991 there were 750 purchase orders processed for the Municipal 
Government. 

• From July 2, 1991 to December 1, 1991 there were 1,950 purchase orders process for the School 
Department. 

• From July 2, 1991 to December 1, 1991 there were 1,465 requests for payment processed. 

DATA PROCESSING 

This has been a year of change for the Data Processing division. The most noteworthy event was the retirement 
of Barbara Botsch, Data Processing Manager. Barbara worked for the Town for over thirty-two years and was the person 
most responsible for bringing the Town into the age of computerization. She was instrumental in developing the Data 
Processing division. In conjunction with Barbara Botsch's retirement, Barbara Morache was appointed as the new Data 
Processing Manager and MaryJane Burwell transferred from the Town Manager's office to the position of Data Processing 
Assistant. 

In addition to staffing changes, another major change was made in the area of real estate and personal property 
tax billing and collection procedures. The quarterly tax bills were printed using a high-grade laser printer which provides 
a more legible bill and one that can be electronically scanned. One of the main advantages of this process is that tax 
collection is now being processed using a lockbox system with the bank. This method allows tax payments to be 
immediately deposited and the payment information is electronically transferred to the Town's computer records. In the 
future, additional types of collections will be processed using this method. This will provide the Town with improved cash 
flow and more efficient use of staff time. 



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TRUST-CEMETERY -SPECIAL FUNDS 

IN CUSTODY OF THE TOWN TREASURER 

YEAR ENDING JUNE 30. 1001 









BALANCE 








BALANCE 


FUND 


BENEFICIARY 


PRINCIPAL 


JULY 1.1900 


DEPOSITS 


INCOME 


DRAWN 


JUNE 30. 1991 


STABILIZATION 


TOWN 




052.014.51 


00.000.00 


58.268.28 




770.882.79 


RETIREMENT 


TOWN 




305.000.00 




6.758.52 


214.000.00 


97.764.58 


CD. WOOD 


MEMORIAL 




545.122.34 




46.272.59 




591.394.93 


INSURANCE 


TOWN 




298.270.74 




22.205.30 




320.482.04 


UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 






107.213.01 


100.000.00 


11.001.80 


90,000.00 


128.275.41 


POST WAR REHABILfTATION 


TOWN 




28.944.78 




2,154.81 




31.099.59 


ESTATE S.P. WHITE 




5,78863 


7.930.04 




590.34 




8.520.38 


POLICE DRUG ACCOUNT 


POLICE 




3.008.33 


5.215.00 


201.15 


340.00 


8.144.48 


STATE GRANT MDCR 






2.309.07 




150.07 


2.469.04 


0.00 


TOWN HALL RESTORATION 






100.44 




10.81 




177.25 


CD&P-ROGERS BROOK 






0.00 


47.234.53 


1,675.67 


30.000.00 


18,910.20 


TDJ-SPECIAL 




14.300.00 


2.009.44 




142.51 




2.151.95 


PWED-SPECIALTOWN 




200.000.00 


108.420.41 




6.624.31 


38.683.72 


76.367.00 


TOWN INSURANCE HEALTH 






090.830.27 


3,107.700.68 


44.172.22 


3.733.559.78 


175.233.39 


M.V. LIBRARY CONSORTIUM 


LIBRARY 




242.927.42 


252.500.00 


24.245.40 


203.338.70 


316.334.12 


J. GREELEY 


LIBRARY 


5.000.00 


5.000.00 




420.17 


429.17 


5.000.00 


MARGARET G. TOWLE 


PRINCIPAL 


345.823.50 


345.825.50 




34.645.07 


34,645.97 


345.825.50 


MARGARET G.TOWLE 


INCOME 




131.272.87 


34.645.97 




33,262.07 


132.656.77 


JOHN CORNELL 


WOOD & COAL 


5.000.00 


20.247.56 




1.872.81 




28.120.37 


DAVID & LUCY SHAW 


WELFARE 


10.000.00 


20.070.43 




2.252.87 


2.000.00 


26.923.30 


W.L. RAYMOND 


WELFARE 


7.845.81 


22.040.09 


61.95 


1.016.58 




24.618.62 


A.J. LINCOLN 


NEEDY CHILDREN 


5,000.00 


13.073.27 




073.23 




14.040.50 


E.I. RAYMOND 


WELFARE/FLOWERS 


1.302.77 


1.500.00 




123.00 


123.90 


1.500.00 


TAYLOR 


FUEL 


300.00 


830.64 


0.00 


07.14 




897.78 


SPRING GROVE 






460.289.90 


27.145.00 


33.210.53 


19.390.55 


501.254.94 


SOUTH CHURCH CEMETERY 


PRINCIPAL 




17.700.73 




0.00 


0.00 


17.709.73 


SOUTH CHURCH CEMETERY 


INTERSET 




1.042.50 




101.42 


161.42 


1.942.50 


SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 


LOT SALES 




70.404.00 


13.585.00 


5.851.24 




95.900.24 


WEST PARISH 






2.200.28 




190.92 


171.20 


2.310.00 


CHRIST CHURCH 






7.610.00 




642.03 


642.03 


7,610.00 


ST. AUGUSTINES 






650.00 




51.82 


51.82 


650.00 


EMILINE LINCOLN 


A.V.I.S 




1.000.00 




81.50 


81.50 


1,000.00 


EMMA J. LINCOLN 


A.V.I.S 


1.000.00 


544.00 




42.88 


42.88 


544.60 


CONSERVATION FUND 


CONSERVATION 




15,753.07 


12.210.00 


1.492.29 




29,455.36 


SUNSET ROCK EXT 


HAMMOND WAY 




0.857.54 




425.98 




7.283.52 


SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 


PRINCIPAL 




23.032.76 




1,397.04 


3,120.30 


22.209.50 


SMART 


FLOWERS 


1,000 00 


6.555.31 




505.71 


25.00 


7.036.02 


SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 


INCOME 




0.60 




2.40 




12.09 


FARRINGTON 


FLOWERS 


600.00 


1.016.00 




82.86 


30.00 


1.068.86 


BALLARDVALE MEMORIAL 


FLOWERS 


532.88 


805.02 




70.05 


25.00 


910.07 


ALLEN 


FLOWERS 


200.00 


109.40 




13.62 


15.00 


198.11 


DRAPER 


SCHOOL 


1.000.00 


0,005.25 




582.27 




7.487.52 


RICHARDSON 


SHAWSHEEN SCHOOL 


1.000.00 


5.303.30 




451.51 




5.814.81 


A. & A.V.LINCOLN 


SPELLING BEE 


1.000.00 


3.603.33 




302.26 




3.905.59 


RAFTON (PRINCIPAL) 


SCHOLARSHIP 


598.50 


508.50 








598.50 


RAFTON (INTEREST) 






084.77 


92.00 


84.96 


160.00 


1.001.73 


CONROY 


HIGH SCHOOL 


250.00 


700.18 




56.08 




756.26 


AMERICAN LEGION 


HIGH SCHOOL 


200.00 


517.11 




40.55 




557.66 


HOLT 


SCHOOL 


50.00 


318.25 




23.69 




341.94 


GRAND TOTAL ALL TRUST FUNDS 


4.210.520.40 


3.720.480.13 


312.648.96 


4.406.769.05 


3.842.886.50 



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12 



VETERANS SERVICES 

Twenty-six families were assisted in 1991 with funds to help pay expenses for food, fuel, medical, clothing and 
personal needs. These expenditures are reimbursed 75% by the State to the Town according to Chapter 115 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws. 

Fourteen veterans were admitted to Veterans Administration hospitals and thirty-six veterans died during the year, 
one World War I, twenty-eight World War II, six Korean War and one Vietnam War. 

MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

Apart from the Town Meeting vote to transfer funds and the Finance Committee's commitment to remain open on 
Sundays, much as been happening at Memorial Hall Library. With the dosing of the Bailardvale branch and Friday nights, 
the circulation still went up five percent to over 472,000 items. Library use has increased by over 40% in the past five years. 

Several surveys were done over the year. The survey conducted on materials used the most indicated that business 
and management, cooking, personal finance, family problems and child rearing, home and car repair, computers, fitness and 
health, gardening and job search information were high on the list. School work accounted for a number of categories. This 
area of need has increased drastically with the elimination of so many school librarians. For enjoyment, patrons used travel 
books, sports, music and crafts. 

The Reference Department reports that questions are asked about consumer products including car price lists, 
investments, college and scholarship information, tax forms, job searches including resume writing assistance, local 
transportation schedules, support groups, available day care, background on companies and biographical information. 

Another survey done of people entering the library on a given day showed 458 patrons on Sunday and 1 ,440 on 
Monday with the latter almost equally divided between morning, afternoon and evening. Reference was the highest area of 
use on both days, periodicals came second, checkout was third and the Children's Room use was fourth. These figures 
indicate the new direction libraries have taken. They are much more than reading rooms for a small percentage of the 
population. 

The Children's Room provided 123 story hours and experienced a heavy increase in use due to the cutbacks in the 
school library program. The Friends of the Library sponsored all the major programs this year. Money from several book 
sales paid for them. Some of the musical programs have features our newest citizens from Russia. The Annual UN Day 
reception for area foreign students was held for the fifteenth year. 

The dedication of the staff in times like these is impossible to calculate. All have been working harder and producing 
more with much less in the way of help and resources. 



rxx5oonoexxxxjooonooooooooooooooe3ooooooonoo 




13 



TOWN COUNSEL 

During 1991, Attorney Alfred L Daniels retired as Town Counsel and Attorney Thomas J. Urbeiis was appointed as 
his successor. Town Counsel made numerous appearances before State Courts and Administrative Boards. Formal legal 
opinions were researched and rendered to Town officials. Town Counsel rendered in excess of seventy informal opinions 
and had conferences with the Town Mananger and other Town officials on almost a daily basis. Town Counsel reviewed 
all Articles of the Warrant and attended all Town Meetings. During the period covered by this report, contracts were drawn 
and reviewed and numerous deeds, easements, releases, agreements and betterment assessments were drafted and 
recorded. 



JOHN CORNELL WOOD AND COAL FUND 

The John Cornell Wood and Coal Fund was established by Article 17 of the 1893 Town Meeting. Five thousand 
dollars ($5,000.00) was left to the Town to be used to purchase wood or coal for the needy poor. Three trustees, chosen 
on a staggered basis by the Annual Town Meeting, administer the funds. 

Balance on Hand 7-1-90 $26,247.56 

Income 1990/91 1,872.81 

Disbursed -0 - 

Balance on Hand 7/1/91 $28,120.37 



MARGARET G. TOWLE FUND 

Under the terms of her will, the late Margaret G. Towle. long-term resident of Andover, bequeathed the residue of 
her estate to the Town of Andover, to be held and administered by it as a permanent trust fund. This is now known as the 
Margaret G. Towle Fund. Mrs. Towle stipulated in her will that the income from this fund "be devoted to the assistance of 
the procurement of assistance for worthy persons residing in the Town of Andover who may be in need of aid, comfort or 
support on account of old age, disability or unemployment." 

The Fund is administered by a group of three Trustees, chosen by the Town Manager with the approval of the Board 
of Selectmen, which has disbursed the income from the Fund in accordance with the terms of Mrs. Towle's will. The cases 
are referred to the Trustees by private charitable groups and organizations, the Clergy and interested individuals. 

During the twelve month period, the Trustees acted on twenty-six (26) cases, disbursing $49,216.76 on approved 
cases (which numbered 24) and small administration expenses. Only the income of the Fund is available. The principal of 
$345,825.50 and a substantial portion of the current income is invested under the direction of the Trustees. All disbursements 
are made by the Town Treasurer upon vouchers approved by the Trustees. 

Balance of Income as of December 31, 1991 $135,763.50 

Receipts - 1991 25.918.11 

$161,681.61 
Disbursements - 1991 49.216.76 

$112,464.85 



14 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The Andover Fire Department provides emergency and non-emergency services necessary to protect life and property 
in the most efficient cost effective manner possible. Its goals are to prevent the loss of life and injury from fire, fire-related 
hazards, accidents and natural disasters; prevent loss to property from fire or fire-related activities; prevent loss of life through 
prompt professional delivery of emergency medical services; and, increase fire safety awareness among area citizens. The 
Fire Department provides these services through the following divisions: 

The Administration Division is supervised by the Fire Chief who manages the department's daily business operations. 
He coordinates the Department's activities, plans, directs, controls, and evaluates the operating budget; prepares personnel 
and payroll records for 67 employees; coordinates the hiring of new employees; develops management policies; evaluates 
and expands the use of computers in the department; coordinates the secretarial and word processing support to all the 
divisions. 

The Fire Fighting Division is concerned almost exclusively with the containment and extinguishing of fires within the Town 
of Andover. This effort includes answering service calls which may lead to the early discovery/prevention of fires and 
stabilizing hazardous materials incidents. It also includes formulation and rehearsal of plans concerning how to fight fires 
at various locations. This year the department became a member of this region's Haz-Mat team and as a result, the region's 
Haz-Mat vehicle and team will respond to any hazardous material incidence In Town. 

The Fire Prevention Division is supervised by the Fire Prevention Deputy who ensures that conditions favorable to the 
starting of fires do not exist in the Town of Andover. The inspections conducted and public relations programs instituted, 
especially in the local schools, are designed to contribute to this goal. Fire investigations seek to discover the causes of 
fire and prevent their recurrence. A training program provides department personnel with the necessary knowledge to 
accomplish these goals. 

The Arson Division is supervised by the Arson Investigator who responds to all fires that are suspicious in nature. 

The Fire Alarm Division is responsible for the Fire Alarm system which is coded and consists of approximately three and 
one-half million feet of aerial and underground wiring, street alarm boxes, and related signalling equipment. The installation 
of street alarm boxes and related wiring is accomplished by department personnel. Maintenance to all phases of the system 
is also accomplished. 

The Ambulance Division provides emergency medical care for anyone requesting such care in Andover, as well as 
transportation to emergency care facilities. The ambulance also answers fire alarms as medical back-up for both civilian 
victims of fire and fire department personnel. This year, the Department's two ambulances were equipped with automatic 
Heart/Start defibrillators. Due to that addition, both ambulances were upgraded from basic to enhanced service. Both 
residents and non-residents are billed for ambulance services through third-party billing. At the present time, fifty-three 
members of the Andover Fire Department are nationally registered Emergency Medical Technicians. Twenty-one of these 
are assigned to the ambulance and have successfully completed defibrillation training. 

The Training Division is supervised by the Training Officer and is comprised of the four duty Deputy Chiefs who are 
supplemented by emergency services personnel acting as hazardous material coordinators, emergency medical coordinators, 
EMT instructors, and special training instructors. They are responsible for the yearly training schedule for fire suppression, 
medical emergency, rescue procedures, and hazardous material response team. 

The Maintenance Division is supervised by the Apparatus Maintenance Officer who is responsible for a continuous 
preventive maintenance program for fourteen vehicles to Insure effective and economical operation of equipment. Duties 
include: preventive maintenance checks for all engine and truck companies; test all fire apparatus yearly in accordance with 
N.F.PA Standards; certify annually all S.C.B.A. tanks with the use of authorized flow bench, to meet factory specifications; 
certification and testing of relief drivers and fire apparatus operators with the Training Division; provide 24-hour emergency 
on-call service by Vehicle Maintenance for all Fire Department equipment; assist in development of specifications for fire 
apparatus. 

In addition, both the Police and Fire Departments share Central Dispatch. This communications center receives calls 
for both public safety departments and dispatch vehicles and manpower to all emergency calls using a computer-aided 
dispatch system. 

15 



FIRE DEPARTMENT ACTIVITIES 



Service Calls 

Fire Alarms including both Structures & Vehicles 

Accidental Alarms 

False Alarms of Fire 

Mutual Aid Calls to Other Communites 

Mutual Aid Calls to Andover 

Ambulance Calls 

Ambulance Mutual Aid to other Communites 

Ambulance Mutual Aid to Andover 

Medical Assist Calls 

Persons Billed for Ambulance Service 

Fuel Oil Heat Installation Permits 

Explosive Use Permits 

Building Inspections Conducted 

Fire Drills Conducted 

Flammable Liquid Storage Permits 

Liquified Petroleum Gas Installation Permits 

Cutting/Welding Permits 

Model Rocketry Permits 

Fire Alarm System Permits for New Construction 

Fire Alarm System Permits for Existing Properties 

Fire Alarm System Inspections Conducted 

Miscellaneous Permits Issued 

Fire Alarm Boxes Disconected and Reconnected 



1991 


1990 


1989 


6278 


5992 


5737 


1473 


1424 


1608 


482 


493 


641 


23 


85 


63 


30 


34 


37 


2 


3 


3 


1557 


1503 


1459 


97 


158 


126 


125 


218 


164 


238 


264 


230 


1233 


1339 


1215 


114 


95 


119 


15 


9 


9 


835 


816 


608 


142 


155 


137 


4 


12 


19 


19 


26 


25 


12 


9 


15 


1 


18 


2 


200 


147 


366 


417 


333 


544 


652 


680 


649 


86 


91 


74 


370 


884 





16 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Due to fiscal constraints, the Police Department saw the elimination of three sworn police positions which resulted 
in the layoff of two patrol officers. The department also saw the elimination of two part-time positions; one clerical and the 
Director of the Alternative Sentencing Program. These reductions were accompanied by reductions in overtime, shift filling 
(replacement), cruiser purchase and renegotiations with lieutenants and sergeants over required contract language. A 
smaller police vehicle was added to the fleet of police cruisers to test the size, versatility and cost effectiveness during its 
two-year life. 

The purchase of a new computer system upgraded the department's recordkeeping system. Town Meeting 
appropriated money for minor renovations to the station which was done by the Department of Municipal Maintenance. The 
project included a new detective room, classroom/squad room, records room, and redesign of the lieutenants and sergeants 
working area. The Maintenance Department did an excellent job on this project. The generosity of a local company allowed 
the department to upgrade most of their office furniture at no cost to the Town. 

Following a national pattern, crime overall in Andover was lower than the previous year but violent crimes were on 
a rise. Andover was no exception; we saw the tragic murder of a postal worker while delivering mail and the armed assault 
and battery robbery of a couple of businesses in West Andover. 

1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 



Total Incidents 


23,139 


21,561 


25,080 


25,508 


22.905 


B&E 


185 


162 


278 


180 


170 


Larceny 


519 


581 


691 


611 


467 


Stolen Can 


116 


127 


162 


169 


161 


Stolen Bicycles 


37 


43 


38 


56 


100 


MV Accidents 


1,393 


1,184 


1,216 


1,170 


1,106 


MV Fatalities 


4 


5 


5 


4 


3 


Vandalism 


353 


469 


368 


327 


341 


Parking Violations 


11375 


13,380 


11,750 


11,674 


9,699 


MV Citations 


3,786 


3,782 


4,746 


4,152 


3,023 


Mileage 


366,910 


324,288 


364,737 


430.54S 


414,764 


Gasoline 


51,646 


48,166 


51,280 


46,001 


49,694 



Detective Division 

During 1991 the Detective Division Investigated four hundred twenty-four incidents which was an increase of ninety- 
eight incidents investigated by the division in 1990. After investigation, three hundred thirty-six incidents were cleared for 
a clearance rate of 79.25%. Burglary statistics were the same as 1990, however, there was a change in the types of breaks. 
Business breaks increased, especially in the so-called smash and grab type. Dwelling breaks were down slightly. There were 
a series of breaks in the West Andover area during the early Fall, setting a particular pattern. After investigation, a subject 
was charged with five breaks. Most burglaries during the past year were spread throughout Town with no particular pattern. 
There were five armed robbery investigations in 1991. Due to the seriousness of the crimes, extensive investigations were 
conducted. The Juvenile Officer investigated thirty-two incidents requiring either parental conference or court diversion 
programs. 

A meeting was held at the end of the year with the other Greater Lawrence Police Detective Divisions regarding the 
exchange of information. Arrangements are being worked out to link all records through the computer system which would 
enable immediate access to desired information. 



17 



Civil Defense 

This past year saw the Civil Defense Director attend less state meetings and also saw the Town utilize and exercise 
their emergency plans (Hurricane Bob and late summer storm). 

The state appointed a new Director of Civil Defense with a mission to revamp and rebuild a new organization. The 
name was changed from Massachusetts Civil Defense to The Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency. The new 
Governor required increased protection for Massachusetts residents within the 10-mile area of the Seabrook Nuclear Plant. 
The resulted in a reorganization at the MEMA headquarters in Tewksbury, thus reducing the amount of activity being handled 
there. 

Both storms were handled very well by all Town departments and because of updated regulations and action plans, 
Andover was able to apply to MEMA for reimbursement for many expenses incurred during the storm. The Director also 
notified private educational institutions about reimbursement procedures which resulted in some of them receiving help. 

Chief Robert Merrill of the Auxiliary Police and his men attended training sessions throughout the year. This group 
also assisted in many of the yearly town functions along with assistance during the two storms. 

The Radio Group also assisted in all these yearly functions along with their weekly communication drills. 

It is certainly gratifying for a department head to know that he has additional support in the event that it is needed. 
This is definitely the case with the Civil Defense Volunteers. The hours donated by these dedicated volunteers has enriched 
the services to the Town and also assisted in increased protection and safety for the citizens of the community. I want to 
thank these dedicated members for their general donation of time and assistance throughout the year. 

Animal Control Officer 



1990 



1291 



Lost Dogs 


132 


94 


Dogs Found 


71 


47 


Dog Complaints 


871 


786 


Dead Dogs Picked Up 


5 


7 


Impounded Dogs 


155 


131 


Impounded Cats 


32 


54 


Dead Cats Picked Up 


34 


26 


Various Dead Animals Pick Up 


320 


269 


Number of Citations Issued 


41 


54 


Number of Calls Answered 


2,418 


2,041 


Money Collected 


$2,355.65 


$2,603.00 


Administrative Fees 


2,313.65 


2.537.00 


Dogs Sold 


42.00 (14) 


66.00 (22) 


Amount of Gas 


1,436 gallons 


1,369.5 gallons 


Amount of Mileage 


12,899.8 


11,926.2 



PRO BONO WORK PROGRAM hours 



hours 



18 



Game Wardens 

The Constable Game Wardens of Andover spent about 1200 hours of patrolling during 1991. Town, AVIS and 
conservation land was patrolled periodically but there were no serious violations. The Game Wardens monitored the Harold 
Parker State Forest and reported any violations that are observed. 

The Shawsheen River was stocked with excellent trout although not as many as last year. Fishing was good 
throughout the summer. There was very little trapping again this year as fur prices were unusually low. There were a 
number of sick racoons trapped and destroyed. During the deer season, the local wardens assisted the State whenever 
possible due to their depleted ranks. It was an excellent season for deer in the area and a good harvest was evident from 
reported statistics. As in the past, a number of deer were hit by motor vehicles; some were killed and some were injured 
and disappeared back into the woods. Those that were salvaged were given away legally and the others were disposed of 
according to the state law. There was one beaver problem at Fish Brook and that was resolved through trapping. 

We also wish to thank Chief Johnson for his assistance during the year. 



ANIMAL INSPECTION 



1990 



1991 



Number of dogs quarantined for biting 


27 


Number of animals tested for Rabies 





Number of bams inspected 


33 


Number of beef carves under one year 


4 


Number of beef cows 


10 


Number of beef heifers one to two years 


25 


Number of beef bulls 


4 


Number of beef steers 


60 


Number of beef herds* 


1 


Number of donkeys 





Number of horses 


79 


(includes work and saddle horses) 




Number of ponies 


30 


Number of goats 


5 


Number of sheep 


1 


Number of swine 


103 


Number of swine herds* 


1 



20 


28 

23 

47 

8 

3 

35 

3 

11 

72 

23 
13 

3 
77 

2 



* One animal constitutes a herd 




m 




19 



COMMUNITY SERVICES 

The Department offers year round recreational, enrichment and cultural programs for residents of all ages. The 
majority of the programs are held at the public schools. Recreation Park, Pomps Pond, Central Park, the Town House and 
other in-town facilities are utilized. 

Blue program booklets were mailed to all residents. Winter registration proved to be an all time revenue producer. 
Computer, ballroom dancing and language classes were the top picks. The All-Day Camp program continued to flourish 
setting new enrollment and revenue records. The Drop-In playground program had its highest enrollment in years. The teen 
program continued including a concert night for teens by teens. Successful teen trips included the Hard Rock Cafe, 
Hampton Beach and Canobie Lake. 

The nuisance weeds were harvested from Pomps Pond making swim conditions the best in years. Stickers continue 
to be sold for $10 ($2 second car); over 200 more than last season. Our first craft fair in the Town House was a huge 
success. An ice rink was maintained by volunteers throughout the winter of the multipurpose court at Rec Park. The 
Haunted House and Mitten Tree again saw record participation. Several people participated in trips to Alaska and Disney 
World. 

Community Services is thankful for the tremendous efforts from volunteers. We thank the community for its support 
and look forward to providing quality programs to all residents. 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

The greatest accomplishment in 1991 is the 25% increase in the Adult Day Care Program enrollment. For the first 
time in the eight-year history of this program we have a waiting list. This is due to the tremendous need for caregiving to 
our ever increasing senior population. The program enjoys a wonderful reputation and we are proud to have it as such a 
vital part of the Council on Aging. 

We have announced the start of a Volunteer Driver Program. We now have the ability to provide transportation to 
medical appointments for those seniors in need of such a service. Several of our clients nave taken advantage of this 
program. 

A "Supper Club" was started about nine months ago for "well" seniors who enjoy spending time with their peers in 
a social atmosphere in the evening. The last Wednesday of each month finds an average of 25 people at a restaurant in 
the Greater Lawrence area enjoying a price-fixed dinner. The monthly event is very popular and many times several staff 
members join the group. 

AARP is holding monthly membership meetings as well as Board meetings here. The numbers fluctuate between 
80 and 100 people at every meeting. The Board is very pleased with our facility and very much appreciates our ability to 
provide the space. 

The volunteer commitment is still very strong. Again this year we realized $1 ,000.00 through the sale of crafts and 
raffles of hand-made items. 

The Meals-on-Wheels and Lifeguard Programs, although the numbers have stabilized, continue to provide a much 
needed service. 

We continue to offer seminars on Long Term Care, Financial Planning and Health Insurance. The Alzheimer, 
Parkinson and Stroke Support Groups are still in place and very well attended. Health education programs, eye screening, 
cholesterol screenings and blood pressure clinics continue and are also well attended. 

The numbers of the Drop-In Center continue to grow. It has become the meeting place for many seniors and they 
enjoy the coffee, goodies and sociability. 



20 



GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL SCHOOL 

The Annual Report of the Greater Lawrence Technical School is prepared each year in conformity with the terms 
of the Agreement to Establish a Regional Vocational School District. Participating communities in the Region are the City 
of Lawrence and the Towns of Andover, North Andover and Methuen. Under the terms of the Agreement, the content of 
the Annual Report is to contain a detailed financial statement for the prior year and a budget for the current year. Further, 
it is required that for each budget period there be included a statement showing the method by which the annual charges 
assessed to each member community were computed. Lastly, along with statistical and financial data, the Regional School 
Committee may add such additional information relating to the operation and maintenance of the school deemed necessary 
or appropriate. 

FACILITY USE 

Following a policy adopted when the school was initially built, the school has been made available to organizations 
within the region who desire to use many of the school's varied facilities. During the school year 1990-91, over seventy 
organizations used the facilities. 

REGULAR DAY STUDENTS 1990-91 

On October 1, 1990, a total of 1,530 regular day school students were enrolled from the following communities: 
Andover - 39; Lawrence - 1,159; Methuen - 282; and North Andover - 50. The following courses were offered: 



Allied Health Tech 

Auto Body 

Automotive 

Carpentry 

Construction & Building/Painting 

Cosmetology 

Culinary Arts 



Data Processing 

Distributive Education 

Drafting 

Electrical 

Electronics 

Food Tech/Management/Clothing 

Graphic Communications Technology 



Heavy Equipment 

Industrial Electronics 

Machine Technology 

Major Appliance/Air Cond./Refrig. 

Metal Fabrication 

Plumbing & Pipefitting 

Small Engine Repair 

Upholstery 



PLACEMENT OF GRADUATES 1990-91 





Students 


Percent of 


New Co-Op 




EmDloved 


Senior Class 


Aqreements 


September 


132 


42% 


8 


October 


158 


51% 


7 


November 


164 


53% 


1 


December 


169 


55% 


3 


January 


177 


58% 


2 


February 


188 


62% 


1 


March 


194 


64% 


1 


April 


199 


66% 


5 


June 


239 


83% 


3 



As of graduation day in May 1991, over 83% of the senior class had received employment. The business firms with 
Cooperative Work Agreements with the school numbered 1,798, an increase of 31 companies within one year. 



21 



chatii unnci ikioial 

fOCWIOIlL - TICHICIL 

iici sciooi oimict 

BUDGET FY 1992 



jawait o), i«i 



1000 



ciiim 





WUtl of IISTMCTIOI 




2000 


DAT SCIOOI 


35,434,100.10 




HICIIL O0CATI0I 


$314,517.00 


3000 


aoiiliait uncus 




3350 


COST OF TIA1SPO1TATI0I 




4100 


OPIIATIOI OF Pill? 




4300 


lAiimiici or run 




5000 


spicial cuius 




(000 


llfCILLUIOOf 




7000. 


OOTUT 




1000 


DIIT IITIIDUT 





Fvndi for inaction 

PWIL THIS CI 71, 1 ISC 
SCIOOI MX THIS CI 71,711,711,7 74 
SCIOOI ILK ASSIST CI 445, 511 
HCIOIkL SCIOOI AID CI 71, KD 
TUITIOI STAT1 1A1DS C174, SS7, S, CI 74 
SCIOOI AID CI 70 

onn runs 



IH TOTAL 



MM. 475. 00 

5,739,317.00 



495,390.00 

511,777.00 

1,054,034.00 

(14,774.00 

1,394,579.00 

(0,000.00 

30,000.00 

0.00 

$10,441,310.00 



4(4,110.00 

0.00 

0.00 

1,412,900.00 

11,724.00 

3,743,377.00 

100,000.00 

$(,134,013.00 

$4,307,297.00 





IATI0 
STMIT • 
POPOLATIOI 




iowit siui rot iaci iuiicipalitt 






AOCOST 1 


DICHIIl 1 


APHL 1 


JUII 1 


TOTAL PATIIIT 


UDOTII 


0.02(( 


24,(43.50 


21,(43.50 


24,(43.50 


21,(43.50 


114,574.00 


LAIII1CI 


0.7537 


111,(02.50 


111,(02.50 


111,(02.50 


411,(02.50 


3,244,410.00 


IIT10II 


0.1IS7 


199,9((.25 


199,9((.2S 


199,9((.2S 


199,9((.25 


799,445.00 


10. AIDOTIl 


0.0340 


34.(12.00 


3(, (12.00 


3(, (12.00 


34,412.00 


144,4(1.00 



1.0000 $1,074,124.25 $1,074,124.25 $1,074,424.25 $1,074,424.25 $4,307,297.00 



Ii;i::ti<si:!:ii:i:iiiiiiiittt]t3iiit>iiiiiii:ti3:ii3it:t:i>t3tt::::t:ii>ii:>:tt:itini::i:ss::£::i::tii<:ii> 



22 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER.MASSACHUSETTS 

FUND ANALYSIS AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1991 



PRINCIPAL FUND 



CASH 

PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 



SECURITIES 
STOCK 



200 SHARES 
300 SHARES 
200 SHARES 
1000 SHARES 
100 SHARES 
600 SHARES 
300 SHARES 
100 SHARES 
300 SHARES 
150 SHARES 
100 SHARES 
100 SHARES 
200 SHARES 



OTHER 



ALZACORP. 
BAXTER INTL INC. 
COMMUNITY PSYCH CENTERS 
DUFF & PHELPS SEL. UTILITIES 
EMPLOYEE BENEFIT PLANS INC. 
HEALTH CARE COMPARE 
HEALTHSOUTH REHAB. CORP. 
MOTOROLA INC. 
SERVICEMASTER LTD. PRT. 
THERMO INSTRUMENT INC. 
WATE MANAGEMENT INC. 
WELLMAN INC. 
XEROX CORP. 

TOTAL STOCK 



$1 5,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE, DUE 2/1 5/98. 8.1 25% 
$19,646 U.S. TREASURY NOTE. DUE 8/15/98. 7.125% 

TOTAL OTHER 

TOTAL SECURITIES 

RESERVE-LOWER OF COST OR MARKET 

TOTAL PRINCIPAL FUND 

RESERVE FUND 



RESERVE CASH 

ANDOVER SAVINGS BANK PRIME ACCOUNT 
PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 

TOTAL RESERVE FUND 

CASH FUND 



CHECKING ACCOUNT 
BAYBANK 



MARKET VALUE 
BOOK MARKET OVER 

VALUE VALUE BOOK VALUE 



32.749.60 32,749.60 



4.320.75 
6,421.72 

10,742.47 10,742.47 



TOTAL FUNDS 



2.288.30 2.288.30 
146,320.33 198.685.02 



0.00 



4.437.50 


9,825.00 


5.387.50 


6.712.50 


12.000.00 


5.287.50 


4.925.00 


2,825.00 


(2.100.00) 


10.000.00 


10,000.00 


0.00 


4.025.00 


5,275.00 


1,250.00 


1.987.50 


23.700.00 


21.712.50 


4.762.50 


15,825.00 


11,062.50 


6,425.00 


6,525.00 


100.00 


6,900.00 


11,175.00 


4.275.00 


3,731.25 


3,581.25 


(150.00) 


3,775.00 


4.212.50 


437.50 


2,425.00 


2.250.00 


(175.00) 


10,875.00 


13.700.00 


2.825.00 


70,981.25 


120.893.75 


49.912.50 


14,680.58 


16.373.40 


1.692.82 


14,878.13 


15.637.50 


759.37 


29.558.71 


32.010.90 


2.452.19 


100,539.96 


152.904.65 


52.364.69 


0.00 






133,289.56 


185.654.25 


52.364.69 



0.00 



0.00 
52.364.69 



23 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER.MASSACHUSETTS 

STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1991 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND SPECIAL FUNDS 







CURRENT 










BALANCE 


YEAR 


SUB 


LESS 


BALANCE 




1/1/91 


NET INCOME 


TOTAL 


AWARDS 


12/31/91 


H.W.& M.P.BARNARD 


3.354.76 


83.55 


3.438.31 


0.00 


3.438.31 


J.W.BARNARD 


6,776.99 


168.77 


6,945.76 


0.00 


6.945.76 


ALICE M.BELL 


1.017.83 


25.35 


1,043.18 


25.00 


1,018.18 


EDNAG.CHAPIN 


2,340.27 


58.28 


2,398.55 


75.00 


2.323.55 


FRED W.DOYLE 


13.137.06 


327.16 


13,464.22 


1.000.00 


12.464.22 


WARREN F.DRAPER 


1,526.91 


38.03 


1,564.94 


50.00 


1.514.94 


WILLIAM G. GOLDSMITH 


1,725.81 


42.98 


1.768.79 


0.00 


1,768.79 


ELIZABETH T.GUTTERSON 


1,017.82 


25.35 


1,043.17 


25.00 


1.018.17 


MYRON E.GUTTERSON 


1,019.93 


25.40 


1.045.33 


25.00 


1.020.33 


ANDOVER GRANGE 


2.626.21 


65.40 


2.691.61 


200.00 


2.491.61 


PUNCHARD TRUSTEES 


10,608.56 


742.58 


11,351.14 


1,000.00 


10.351.14 


RESERVE-COST OR MKT. 


(2.293.75) 


2.293.75 


0.00 




0.00 




42,858.40 


3.896.60 


46.755.00 


2.400.00 


44.355.00 



SUMMARY- INCOME/(EXPENSE) 



INTEREST INCOME 1 .355.31 

DIVIDEND INCOME 786.52 

GAIN/(LOSS) ON SALE OF SECURITES 0.00 

BROKERAGE FEES (198.98) 

INVESTMENT COUNSEL FEES (340.00) 

ADJ.TO LOWER OF COST OR MARKET 2.293.75 

NET INCOME 3.896.60 



FUNDS/SECURITIES HELD 

PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 

100 SHARES BRISTOL MYERS SQUIBB CO. 

100 SHARES CRAY RESEARCH INC. 

100 SHARES DUN & BRADSTREET CORP. 

200 SHARES GREENARY REHABILITATION GROl 

50 SHARES NICHOLS INSTITUTE -NEW 

50 SHARES NICHOLS INSTITUTE CL C -NON VI 

350 SHARES ROLLINS ENVIRONMENTAL SVCS. 

100 SHARES XEROX CORP. 

(1) CERTIFICATE OF DEPOSIT- ANDOVER BANK 

RESERVE FOR LOWER OF COST OR MARKET 



MARKET 


BOOK 


VALUE 


VALUE 


5.881.91 


5.881.91 


8.825.00 


5,350.00 


3,875.00 


3.375.00 


5,750.00 


4,262.50 


I 1,025.00 


1,650.00 


687.50 


700.00 


681.25 


700.00 


3.500.00 


4.812.50 


6.850.00 


5,437.50 


12.185.59 


11,808.65 




0.00 


49.261 .25 


43.978.06 



24 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER.MASSACHUSETTS 

STATMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 , 1 991 

SUMMARY OF TRANSACTIONS 



01/01/91 



PRINCIPAL FUND 



12/31/81 



PAINE WEB8ER CASH FUND 
SECURITIES AT BOOK VALUE 



RESERVE FOR LOWER OF 
COST OR MARKET 



30.041.85 -LOSS ON SALE OF SECURITIES 

03.540.90 -BROKERAGE FEES/TAX 

-INVESTMENT COUNSEL FEE 
-10% OF ANNUAL INCOME(1/1- 12/31/91) 
-TRANSFER FROM RESERVE FUND-8/91 
-CONTRIBUTION -CLASS OF 1938 
0.00 -ADJUSTMENT TO COST/MARKET RESERVE 



6,771.81 PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 



124.491.75 



(777.22) 


SECURITIES AT BOOK VAL 


(1.587.00) 




1.197.00 




3.045.00 




128.42 


RESERVE FOR LOWER OF 


0.00 


COST OR MARKET 



32.749.60 
100.539.96 



0.00 



DECREASE 



8.797.81 



133.28956 



CASH IN BANK-SAVINGS 
CASH IN BANK-CHECKING 
PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 



OPERATING ACCOUNTS 

(RESERVE FUND & CASH ACCOUNT) 
INCOME 

4.092.37 

2.478.34 DIVIDENDS RECEIVED 
5.555.62 INTEREST RECEIVED -BONOS/NOTES 
INTEREST RECEIVED - OTHER 



12.126.33 



INCOME TOTAL 



2.404.50 
6.243.17 
3.324.41 

11.972.08 



CASH IN BANK -SAVINGS 
CASH IN BANK-CHECKING 
PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 



4.320.75 
2.288.30 
6.421.72 



13.030.77 



EXPENSES 

ANDOVER HIGH SCHOOL PROJECTS 
MISC. OPERATING EXPENSES 

EXPENSE TOTAL 

NET GAIN 
TRANSFERS TO PRINCIPAL: 
-10% OF INCOME (1/1-12/31/90) 
-UNEXPENDED SCHOOL PROJECT FUNDS 

INCREASE 



6.418.66 
406.98 

6.825.64 

5.146.44 

1.197.00 

3.045.00 (7/1/90 - 6/30/91) 



904.44 



136.618.08 



TOTAL PRINCIPAL AND OPERATING ACCOUNTS 



146.320.33 



25 



ANDOVER HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

The major thrust of the Commission's activities in 1991 was to strengthen and expand on initiatives begun in 1989 
and 1990. This focus will continue in 1992 along with a serious effort to bring about the acceptance by Town Meeting of 
one or more local historic districts. 

Working with the Andover Historical Society, the Commission, represented by Karen Herman, continued its annual 
preservation award program by recognizing outstanding examples of local preservation efforts throughout Andover at a well- 
attended ceremony at Memorial Hall Library. In another joint effort with the Society, the historic building marker program 
made further progress with additional stimulus needed and planned for 1992. 

In pursuit of the Commission's goal to work more closely and coordinate activities with other town bodies, good 
progress was achieved in 1991. Ellen Zipeto was appointed as the Commission's representative to the Design Advisory 
Group; Norma Gammon attends Planning Board meetings while Selectmen Bill Downs is a frequent attendant of this 
Commission's monthly meetings. Our input into the Town's Master Plan was thoroughly updated last September and we 
have participated fully with the Town Manager and Selectmen on their project Towards the 21st Century". 

Our intensive and ongoing efforts to preserve the Post Office building at 71 Main Street continues with the 
Massachusetts Historical Commission, U.S. Post Office authorities, the Planning Department and a prospective developer. 

Other 1991 initiatives included the resolution of design problems in connection with the Barnard Block; 10-16 Main 
Street; as well as handicap access to stores in The Aberdeen" building; and 348-362 North Main Street in the Shawsheen 
Village Historic District. While the Commission's efforts to find an alternative to demolishing the building located at 33 
Chestnut Street failed, we are pleased with the dialogue which occurred among the developer, the Commission, and other 
Town boards which influenced the building's final design and impact on the neighborhood. 

The Commission's first review under the 1990 Demolition Delay Ordinance involved a garage located at 22 Williams 
Street in the Shawsheen Village Historic District. Demolition was approved after a public hearing. An attempt by certain state 
interests to supersede home rule ordinances such as Demolition Delay is being strongly opposed by this Commission. 

The Commission has strongly supported the preservation of church steeples by both West Parish and South 
Churches. The West Parish received our local preservation award for its restoration effort and we have endorsed efforts by 
the South Church to solicit funds from the whole community to preserve its steeple and clock. 

The Commission was pleased at the success of our nomination of Elaine Finbury for her work in restoring McKeen 
Hall on the Abbot Academy campus for a state preservation award granted by the Massachusetts Historical Commission. 
We continue to endorse efforts by Phillips Academy to restore Abbot Hall and Draper Hall and applaud their decision to 
inventory all buildings located on school property, part of the Academy Hill Historical District. 

The initiative to establish one or more local historic districts In Andover is long overdue. We are the only community 
in the Greater Lawrence area without one or more such districts. We believe that plans which are sensitive to neighborhood 
concerns can be developed and approved to assure preservation in the years to come. 

The Commission welcomes the appointment of Joel C. Claydon to its membership on July 22, 1991. 




26 



MUNICIPAL MAINTENANCE 

The Department of Municipal Maintenance provides services to all departments requesting repair or new work to their 
facilities, grounds or vehicles. The department also provides services to the general public for street lighting, traffic lights, 
rubbish pickup, park and parking lot lighting, athletic fields, fencing, leaf composting, Christmas tree pickup, tree work, and 
custodial services for events. The department is charged with keeping Andover facilities, vehicles and grounds in good 
condition and to improve the facilities through an ongoing capital program. The Department of Municipal Maintenance 
provides a cemetery and increased areas for burials are cleared and constructed by the department at a minimal cost. 

The department is required to keep abreast of required Federal, State and Town laws and regulations concerning 
health safety, pesticide application, underground fuel tanks, radon, air quality, asbestos, lead paint and hazardous waste 
disposal. 

The Director of Municipal Maintenance Department has direct supervision of the three Superintendents, Administrative 
Secretary, Account Clerk, and two part-time Receptionist/Switchboard Operators. 

Building Maintenance Division 

The following are some of the highlights which the Building Maintenance Division completed during the year: 

Andover High School - built a masonry sign in front of the high school; replaced floor decking at Lovely Field 
bleachers and repaired and replaced some vertical blinds in classrooms. 

Bancroft School - installed elevator for handicapped; covered some windows in the gymnasium with wood to prevent 
leaking; made covers for all skylights to prevent leaking and installed new concrete sidewalk at the rear of the 
school. 

Doherty Middle School - major roof repairs were done because of vandalism. 

Sanborn School - new cubbyholes were built for kindergarten children. 

Shawsheen School - installed a new pair of outside doors at the rear of the building. 

South School - installed new playground equipment. 

West Elementary School - installed PVC drain pipes in A Pod and Media Center; installed new vertical blinds in 
various rooms; built new art room and storage area in the cafeteria and assisted in controlling the mold problem at 
the school. 

West Middle School - built concrete ramps for the handicapped at the rear of the school. 

Memorial Hall Library - new wooden and glass hand railings were installed on the second floor as a safety feature. 

Town Garage - built new office area. 

Town House - sanded and refinished floor in upstairs hall. 

Town Offices - installed new carpeting In second floor corridor; new men's and women's lavatories installed on first 
floor. 

Police Station - installed new ceilings in dispatchers and lieutenants areas; remodeled detectives area and records 
room and constructed a masonry wall at the rear of the Safety Center. 



27 



Penguin Park - installed new playground equipment for the handicapped and additional swings. 

Ballardvale Playground - installed new playground equipment. 

Cuba Street Playground - installed new playground equipment. 

Town Playgrounds • all town and school pressure-treated playground equipment were sprayed with wood 
preservative in the spring and fall of 1991. 

Balmoral Soccer Field • repointed and repaired fieldstone wall. 

Plumbing. Heating & Electrical Division 

This division is responsible for the maintenance and operation of all electrical, plumbing and heating systems in all 
Town buildings and property. The following are some areas where updating and improvements have been made: 

Bancroft School - installed new gas burner on #2 boiler; installed new high-efficiency lighting and performed 
preventive maintenance on sprinkler and boiler systems. 

Andover High School - performed preventive maintenance on sprinkler system at the Collins Center. 

Doherty Middle School - rebuilt one hot water circulating pump. 

Shawsheen School - installed radon gas control system and installed new fluorescent lighting. 

West Elementary School - installed new sump pumps; replace twelve F/T steam traps; worked on resolving mold 
problems; installed new gas burner in #2 boiler; installed new condensate tank in new boiler room; installed new 
condensate return in old boiler room; replace all mud drum nipples on #1 boiler; removed asbestos in basement 
crawl space in old section and replaced all inefficient lighting. 

West Middle School - installed new sump pumps and replaced inefficient lighting. 

Memorial Hall Library - installed new compressor in main air conditioning system. 

Police Department - installed all new lighting; wired all electrical components for renovations and prewired telephone 
and computer systems. 

South School - installed new, more efficient lighting. 

Town Offices - completed plumbing, electrical, exhaust and air supply for new lavatories and shower facilities. 

All Town and School buildings - performed preventive maintenance on all fans, ventilation systems, sprinkler systems, 
boiler systems and air compressors. 

Parks and Grounds Division 

The three Parks and Grounds divisions (Parks & Grounds, Cemetery and Forestry) are independent and 
interdependent. They all operate under the supervision of one superintendent. They share certain pieces of equipment and 
work together on special projects. As with any public agency with manpower, special equipment and vehicles in its 
inventory, the three divisions perform many tasks seemingly unrelated to their principal horticultural maintenance duties, such 
as delivering surplus government food to the Senior Center, litter control, trash removal, recycling, flagpole maintenance, 
fence/gate/backstop repairs, drainage corrections, ice control, snow removal, and moving extraordinarily heavy objects such 



as Whiskey barrels used as planers in the downtown area. During 1991, all three division performed admirably during 
Hurricane Bob and the subsequent cleanup. 

PARKS 

This division maintains 2.75 million square feet of ballfields and 1 .4 million square feet of lawn areas. Ballfields are 
located on all school grounds and other areas such as Recreation Park, Ballardvaie Playground, Upper Shawsheen, Lower 
Shawsheen, the Bowling Green and the Deyermond Field. Lawn areas are the grounds of all Town and School buildings, 
parks, playgrounds, and designated islands, triangles and other parcels throughout town. Ballfields are prepared (groomed 
and lined) for all secondary school athletic events. Turf maintenance consists of mowing, aerating, watering, overseeding, 
liming, fertilizing and controlling weeds and insects. Pesticide operations are conducted by trained and licensed personnel 
using approved pesticides and methods. The division also maintains small trees, shrubs and shrub beds on Town property, 
and cuts back brush encroaching upon ballfields and recreation areas. 

CEMETERY 

Spring Grove Cemetery on Abbot Street is owned and operated by the Town of Andover. The cemetery contains 
approximately sixty acres and is approximately 75% developed. During 1991 , there were 72 burials and 109 grave sites were 
sold. Out of a total of $57,425 collected, $33,107 was turned over to the Town Treasurer and $24,318 was added to the 
principal of the Perpetual Care Fund. Cemetery operations and maintenance consists of burials, mowing, trimming, turf care, 
pruning of shrubs and small trees, leaf pickup, snow removal, care of its own facilities and equipment, and out-of-cemetery 
tasks such as trash in Recreation Park, drainage work and construction. In 1991 , work was completed on 1 .4 acres for future 
burials. 

FORESTRY 

Forestry is responsible for the maintenance of trees along the roadside, on school property and other Town-owned 
land. During 1991 , 122 dead and dying large trees were removed. Additionally, the division removed approximately 40 trees 
in a wooded 1.4 acre parcel at the Spring Grove Cemetery. In 1991, 37 full-sized shade trees were planted along the 
roadside. Tree varieties planted in 1991 were Bradford Pear, Green Ash, Armstrong Maple and White Pine. Approximately 
25% of the personnel's time was spent on pruning, which consists of street-by-street pruning, problem tree pruning, storm 
repairs, flatclearing of undesirable vegetation and removing obstructions at intersections and curves thus providing better 
visibility. Spray operations were conducted to control poison ivy and other undesirable vegetation along the roadside and, 
with a farm tractor, the division mowed tall weeds along the roadside throughout the Town. 

Municipal Buildings Division 

The Municipal Buildings Division is responsible for scheduling and renting schools, the Town House, Recreation Park 
field, and school fields to non-profit groups, private organizations, individuals and town or school activities. This account 
also pays for the main switchboard at the Town Offices and utility costs associated with the Town and School Administrative 
Offices, Town House and parking lots. 

Vehicle Maintenance Division 

The Vehicle Maintenance Division provides maintenance to all town vehicles. This includes those of the Police, Fire, 
Highway, Sewer and Water Departments, and all other town-operated vehicles. The division contracts for outside repair 
services when necessary. All new equipment purchases are specified and reviewed prior to acquisition through bidding. 
In addition, gasoline is dispersed through a centrally controlled, computerized system. 

In 1991 a new exhaust system was installed in the Vehicle Maintenance garage and a new winch truck was 
purchased for the Forestry Division. In addition, a new overhead door was installed at the garage. 



29 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 
Engineering 

Field surveys, construction plans and documents, competitive bids, field layouts and construction supervision were 
provided for the following projects: 

Completion of traffic light installation and intersection improvements at Lowell Street and Haggetts Pond Road. 

Completion of traffic light installation Dascomb Road at Frontage Road and alterations to Elm Square traffic lights. 

Sewer construction in North Street, Webster Street past Joseph Street and in Greenwood Road from North Street 
to Chandler Road. 

Completion of Rogers Brook East after bond default. 

Surface water drainage in Webster Street, Brundrett Avenue etc. 

A great deal of time was spent this year on the following projects: 

Utility markout and grades for paving projects on North Main Street, High Plain Road, and River Street. 

High Street and Haverhill Street traffic lights installed by Massachusetts Department of Public Works. 

Planned Harding Street railroad bridge replacement by the Massachusetts Department of Public Works. 

North Reading water connection. 

Improvements to Fish brook and Bancroft pumping stations. 

Plans for next major water main replacement project 

Preliminary and/or definitive plans for two subdivisions of land with a total of 1 68 lots were reviewed for the Planning 
Board to determine conformance with its rules and regulations and to ascertain the adequacy of the proposed utilities. The 
necessary performance bond amounts were figured where needed and field inspections of subdivisions under construction 
were carried out. Legal descriptions for roadway layouts and easements were checked before they were filed in the Registry 
of Deeds. 

Survey, easement and betterment plans were prepared where necessary for the projects outlined above and for other 
proposed projects. Federal and State government agencies were consulted on engineering matters, principally concerning 
Chapter 90 construction, sewer main extensions and State highway projects. 

The Engineering Division assists people in obtaining information about existing utilities, street layouts, industrial and 
residential sites and other general information. The engineering records of the Town were maintained and updated. The 
Engineering Division updates the Town Assessors' maps and prints the necessary copies for the Town departments. One 
member of the Engineering Division assisted the Assessors' office part-time during the summer in inspecting and measuring 
up additions and alterations. Street opening permits for the installation and repair of underground utilities were issued 
through this division and the necessary inspections were carried out. 

The Engineering Division consists of four employees. 



30 



Highway 

During 1991, seven streets were resurfaced with bituminous concrete for a total of 3.5 miles. 

During the spring and summer, two sweepers are kept busy with continuous cleaning of all streets after winter 
sanding. Both sweepers start each morning at 5:00 A.M. The Highway Division assists the Engineering Division in its 
inspection of the conditions of new streets before they are accepted as public ways. The Highway Division also provides 
men and equipment for all other divisions when needed. 

One thousand seven hundred fifty-five catchbasins and six storm drains were cleaned and kept free of all debris. 
All Town brooks were also cleaned and maintained. Forty-six catchbasins and one storm drain were repaired due to 
deterioration and damage caused by frost and icy conditions during the winter season. The Highway Division, with the help 
and cooperation of all other Department of Public Works divisions and the Department of Municipal Maintenance, is also 
responsible for snow removal and ice control, including flood control for all Town roads. 

Solid Waste 

The Town, under contract, collected 10,510 tons of residential refuse. Andover, being a member of the North East 
Solid Waste Committee (NESWC), has its refuse transported and processed at the Regional Waste-to-Energy Plant in North 
Andover, where the refuse is incinerated to generate electricity. The Solid Waste Division oversees the mandatory curbside 
recycling program for newspapers/magazines and glass, which recycled 2,932 tons of material last year. The Town also 
maintains a leaf composting site on High Plain, near Bald Hill. Approximately 285 tons of leaves were composted, with the 
compost material being available to Town residents. 

Water 



The Water Division consists of seventeen full-time employees and is responsible for the meter reading, supply, 
treatment and distribution of drinking water to the community. The major components of the water system are as follows: 
Supply - Haggetts Pond, Fish Brook, Merrimack River, Abbot Well; Treatment - 24 MGD Water Treatment Plant; Chlorination 
Facilities - Fish Brook; Pumping Stations - Water Treatment Plant, Fish Brook, Bancroft Reservoir, Prospect Hill and Wood 
Hill. The Water Treatment Plant is a state-of-the-art facility featuring ozonation, coagulation and sedimentation, and granular 
activated carbon (GAC) filtration in its treatment processes. 

Distribution Mains - 182 miles and 9,150 connections. 

The total water pumped to the system from January 1 , 1991 through December 31 , 1991 was 1 ,865,885.000 gallons. 
The average daily pumping was 5,1 12,013 gallons, with a maximum day of 10,920,000 gallons occurring on June 29, 1991. 

Hydrants Repaired - 39 

Hydrants Replaced - 6 

Water Main Breaks Repaired - 18 

House Service Leaks Repaired - 13 

House Services Renewed - 1 1 

Water Main Taps • 2 

New Water Meters Installed • 55 

Old Water Meters Replaced - 179 

Water Meters Repaired - 5 




31 



Sewer 

The Sewer Division is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the wastewater pumping stations on Dale 
Street in Ballardvale, Bridle Path, West Elementary School, Shawsheen Village, and the entire system of sanitary sewers. 

The sewerage system includes sixty-seven miles of sanitary sewers and 4,770 connections. In the past year, the 
division freed thirty-nine blockages in sewer mains, redded sixteen mains, repaired one, and answered forty private sewer 
problems. The raw sewage discharge from Shawsheen Village Pumping Station is collected and transported by means of 
a force main through the City of Lawrence and treated by the Greater Lawrence Sanitary District's regional wastewater 
treatment plant. 

GREATER LAWRENCE SANITARY DISTRICT 

The Greater Lawrence Sanitary District Wastewater Treatment Facility continued to provide service to residential, 
commercial and industrial users in 1991. Since its initial operation in April 1977, the facility has treated 139 billion gallons 
of wastewater that was previously discharged, untreated, into the Merrimack River. 

In 1991 , Andover's share of the flow at the plant was 3.765 million gallons per day. The plant is currently staffed by 
seventy-three people. The operation is continuous 24 hours per day and 365 days per year. The District Commission meets 
monthly to address policy matters. 

ANDOVER RECYCLING 

The year 1991 was the first calendar year of paper and glass curbside recycling in Andover with Waste Management, 
Inc. as the contractor. The Department of Public Works oversaw this contract and recycling continued to be mandatory in 
Andover. Andover Recycling no longer assisted with this program. 

The Town paid a monthly fee to Dave White to collect plastic and aluminum cans on the third Saturday of every 
month. During 1991 , the variety of plastic collected was nan-owed down to just milk and water jugs, #1 and #2 containers. 
This change reflected the fact that markets had changed; namely, the Plastics Again plant in Leominster had gone out of 
business. Approximately one plus tons per month of plastic and cans were collected, remaining the same as 1990. Andover 
Recycling (Fran Fink, then Carol Rougvie) organized our volunteers to assist with this service, which continues to save the 
Town money. 

The closing of Plastics Again eliminated the opportunity to collect styrofoam trays; thus, the collection of lunch trays 
in our schools had to be discontinued. This was a great disappointment to us because we had spent alot of time and effort 
in educating the staff and students about the hazards of incinerating styrofoam. 

Andover Recycling (Joyce Ringleb) continued to organize the collection of newspapers in all our public schools by 
Waste Management. Students in some of our schools also collected deposit and /or recyclable aluminum cans to raise funds 
for school projects. Joyce continued to work in various schools with the students on recycling projects. 

In partnership with Dana Duxbury Associates of Andover and Wheelabrator Environmental Systems, Inc. (owner of 
the North Andover RESCO facility), Andover Recycling (Hanna Castle) launched a button battery recycling program for the 
Town. The button batteries are collected at locations throughout Andover by our volunteers, sorted, counted, and shipped 
to a facility in New York where mercury and silver will be recycled. Dana Duxbury Associates will conduct an ongoing study 
of the program to monitor its success. It is hoped this program will be expanded throughout the other RESCO communities. 

Andover Recycling held meetings every other month. Jinny Cole continued to write a column in the Andover 
Townsman to educate the public about recycling in Andover and environmental issues. Our goals for the future are as 
follows: 1) to encourage the Town and schools to buy paper products made of recycled paper (Support of the recycled 
paper market is necessary to promote successful recycling programs.) and 2) to monitor, assist, and encourage 
comprehensive recycling in Andover. 



32 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING 
Building Division 

The Building Division is charged with the enforcement of the State Building Code 780 CMR of the Acts of 1972 and 
Zoning Act, Massachusetts General Laws 40A The Building Division issues permits for all types of construction including, 
but not limited to, school buildings (both public and private), institutional buildings (nursing homes), business, commercial 
and industrial buildings, dormitories, multi-family as well as single family dwellings, pools, chimneys, signs and additions and 
alterations to all structures. The building officials also perform periodic inspections for those buildings which are required 
to obtain Certificates of Inspection under State Building Code, Table 108. 

Building officials are employed to administer the building code and the zoning bylaws which are adopted by both 
state and local governments. The scope of these codes encompasses a broad range of professional and trade subject area 
such as architecture, engineering, fire safety, law, electrical, carpentry, plumbing and gas. Building officials must be familiar 
with and informed to provide the public with information and guidance on all building and code related matters. 



ZXQS 


Estimated 
Values 


Fees 


Single Family Dwellings 
(including foundations) 


$18,890,485 


$143,915 


New Commercial Construction 


4,645,000 


25,975 


Additions and Alterations to 
All Types of Buildings 


12,707,921 


91,377 


Public Buildings/Schools 


1,116,900 


7,332 


Pods, Chimneys, Raze, Signs 


614,049 


9,642 


Certificates of Inspection 


- 


1,000 


Sealer of Weights & Measures 




1.248 


TOTAL 


$37,974,355 


$280,489 



ELECTRICAL INSPECTIONS 

The purpose of the Massachusetts Electrical Code is the practical safeguarding of persons and property from 
hazards arising from the use of electricity. The Electrical Inspector is responsible for receiving and granting permits and 
scheduling inspections on a daily basis, inspecting all residential, commercial and industrial jobs, approving electrical plans 
for new buildings, assisting the Fire Department in inspections of fires due to faulty electrical devices and seeing that permits 
are issued for repairs due to fire damage. 

Enforcement of fire alarm regulations for new homes, conducting and certifying inspections of schools, public 
buildings, day care centers and nursing homes in conjunctions with the building officials are part of the duties of the electrical 
inspectors. Numerous electrical violations were investigated with the cooperation of Massachusetts Electric Company and 
corrected without incident. 

There were 793 permits issued in 1991 with a total of $35,463.50 in fees collected. 



33 



PLUMBING AND GAS INSPECTIONS 

The inspection and enforcement of plumbing and gas installations is controlled by a State Uniform Plumbing and 
Gas code formulated by the Board of State Examiners of Plumbers and Gas Fitters under authority of Chapter 142 of the 
General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

This office completes the inspection for permitting gas, plumbing and sewer installations and repairs. Following the 
initial inspection, additional inspections are completed during construction to ensure compliance with state codes. A final 
inspection is conducted for the same purpose as well as to sign off on a Certificate of Occupancy. Complaints and violations 
must also be investigated and corrected or reported to the proper authorities. 

There were 454 plumbing permits issued with a total of $29,166 in fees collected, 376 gas permits were issued with 
a total of $10,821 collected making a total of $39,987 in fees collected in 1991. 

SUMMARY OF FEES 

Building $280,489.00 

Electrical 35,463.50 

Plumbing and Gas 39.987.00 

TOTAL FEES COLLECTED $355,939.50 

Conservation Commission 

The Conservation Commission conducted twenty-three regular meetings and numerous site visits in 1991. The 
Conservation Commission, under the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act, conducted ninety-five public hearings, issued 
forty-six Determinations of Applicability, acted on eighteen Notices of Intent, issued eighteen Orders of Condition, two 
Amendments, six Extensions of Permit, forty-seven Certificates of Compliance, twenty-four Enforcement Orders, three 
Emergency Certifications, eighteen Findings of Insignificance for Proposed Plan Changes and approved eight final Wetland 
Map Boundary Changes. Joint meetings were held with the Planning Board to discuss the forthcoming Master Plan and with 
the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager to discuss Towards the 21st Century". 

Under the provisions of the Massachusetts Wetland Protection Act, the Conservation Commission collected filing 
fees in the amount of $14,002.50. 

LAND ACQUISITION 

Without expenditure of Town funds, several important open space and wetland resource protection measures were 
achieved in 1991. Among these were gifts of various permanent open space areas as a result of cluster subdivision 
development including Wyncrest Circle, Belknap Estates and Spencer Court. 

LAND MANAGEMENT 

A management plan was adopted for the John and Marie Boioian Reservation located off Chandler Road. Bluebird 
artificial nesting cavities were installed by a volunteer on Conservation land near the Abbot well on Andover Street. 

MUNICIPAL LEAF COMPOSTING PROGRAM 

The municipal leaf composting program was again conducted on a portion of the Bald Hill Reservation on High Plain 
Road. James Bamford, Supt. of Parks and Grounds, Department of Municipal Maintenance, reports that an estimated three 
hundred sixty tons of leaves were processed. 



34 



COMMUNITY GARDENS 

One hundred thirty gardens plots were assigned at the High Plain Road Community Garden site in 1991. 

ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING 

The commission held an informal meeting with engineers, hydrologists and interested Town officials to review a major 
work in progress entitled "ANDOVER CONSERVATION COMMISSION STORMWATER MANAGEMENT GUIDEUNES". This 
effort has been led by commission member Mark Curtin who is a practicing Professional Engineer. Publication of this 
document is anticipated in the Summer of 1992. 

Health Division 

The Health Division staff consists of a Director, Registered Sanitarian, a Health Code Enforcement Orricer, two part- 
time Registered Nurses and an Administrative Secretary. The division is structured to facilitate three operational objectives: 
administration of the division, providing clinical public health services and addressing significant environmental responsibilities 
impacting health. 

Inspection workload shifted dramatically in 1991 from land use and development related activities to basic sanitary 
code enforcement projects. Declines in subdivision review, percolation testing, water table determinations and new septic 
system installations have enabled us to redistribute resources to increased inspection and code enforcement priorities in food 
service sanitation, beach and pool water quality surveillance and an agressive housing code monitoring effort. 

Andover shares in regional and national concerns relative to environmental issues which impact the quality of life. 
Air pollution control of local industries, indoor air quality in public buildings, especially schools with their fragile populations, 
better management of local hazardous materials and waste inventories are examples of Andover's concerns which are a 
microcosm of society's problems. 

Thanks to a grant of $7,500 from the Andover Home for Aged People, a major focus of Andover public health officials 
over the next three years will be assessment of health needs of the community's senior citizens. The department hopes to 
inventory existing services, assess impacts of health behaviors, such as smoking, diet, stress and to design new programs 
and intervention strategies to address these needs. 

Total revenue in the Health Division increased by about ten percent in the first six months of FY1992. Total revenue 
for the division in 1991 was $45,450.80. Permit fee increases, recently passed by the Board of Health, should help stabilize 
revenue production in FY1993. 

Mary Hamilton, R.N. B.S.N., retired in June after twenty-four years to work part-time in the same position. She serves 
on the following boards and committees: VNA Home Care - Professional Advisory Committee; Elder Services of Merrimack 
Valley Advisory Board and Long Range Planning Committee; Fidelity House Human Rights Committee and Andover Home 
for the Aged Board of Directors. Pat Wilson, R.N., increased her hours as part-time Public Health Nurse. 

Disease prevention is always a number one issue. Tuberculosis, food and water borne diseases, hepatitis, 
encephalitis, whooping cough, Lyme disease and AIDS are present in our community. Infants and children must receive all 
recommended immunizations. Hepatitis B vaccine will be given beginning in 1992 to all infants and children in order to 
prevent the continuing spread of this serious disease. Influenza and pneumonia vaccinations were extremely well attended 
this year. The state aggressively advertised the need for this vaccine and Medicare sent letter to all recepients advising them 
of the vaccine. Cholesterol clinics are well attended and it is a good method to prevent disease and promote health. 

COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CONTROL 

The Health Division receives all reports of the reportable communicable disease cases and ensures these cases are 
investigated by the Public Health Nurse who sends a case record to the State Department of Public Health. Venereal 



35 



diseases are reported directly to the state by the physician. Preventing communicable diseases and containing them when 
they occur is a top priority of the Andover Health Department. 

The following is a list of communicable diseases reported to the Health Department in 1991: 



Animal Bites 


18 


Chicken Pox 


198 


Hepatitis 
viral Meningitis 
Meningitis Infection 
Meningitis 
Salmonella 


1 
4 
5 
1 
8 


Salmonella Typhi 

Mumps 

Giardia 


1 

1 

10 


Hepatitis 


1 



State regulations regarding reportable diseases are administered by the Public Health Nurse. Mantoux testing for 
exposure to tuberculosis, active disease detection, school and nursing home employment is done free of charge by the 
Public Health Nurse. Positive Mantoux reactors and active tuberculosis cases are followed and referred to the area 
Tuberculosis Clinic at Lawrence General Hospital. The nurse takes histories, makes x-ray appointments, monitors medication, 
ensures proper blood tests are done and does (Snellen) eye exams on clinic patients. The Public Health Nurse monitored 
an inactive case of TBC for several months and the patient took TB medication in the Health Department Clinic. 

Mantoux Testing 137 

Reactor Follow-up 53 

Histories & Clinic Cases 6 

Communicable Disease Case Records 49 

Clostridium Septicum - Investigation 1 

Cholesterol Screening Clinics 

The Health Division continued cholesterol clinics on a monthly basis throughout the year. The fee was $5.00. 
Screening was done in the Health Department Clinic/Nurses office. The division participated in the Genetics Health Fair and 
screened thirty-four employees. Two Public Health Nurses and a Health Division machine operator performed the testing 
and interviews. Cholesterol education, recommendations and referral were part of this process. A letter of approval from 
the Department of Public Health, Health Care Quality Department, was received for cholesterol health promotion screening 
programs. 

Andover Resident Cholesterol Screening Clinics 

amies 10 

Screened 186 

El evated Result ( > 200) 1 59 

Influenza and Pneumovax Clinics 

Two clinics were held for Andover residents over 60 and those with certain diseases. The first clinic was held on 
October 31 , 1991 at the Doherty Middle School with one volunteer Health Board physician, four health department staff, two 
health department nurses, seven volunteer registrars and Andrea Davenport, M.D.P.H., Pneumovax State Program. Over 
four hundred persons arrived during the course of one hour causing parking problems and dangerous overcrowded 
conditions. Mary Hamilton R.N. wrote recommendations to the Board addressing these problems and recommending pre- 
registration prior to clinics next year, holding two clinics at Doherty Middle School and vaccinating frail elders in the Health 
Department nurse's office. The second influenza and pneumovax clinic was held Tuesday, November 19, 1991 at the Senior 
Center. Six Health Department staff, three volunteer nurses and four volunteer registrars staffed the clinic. The Public Health 



36 



Nurses went to the Police Department and administered influenza immunizations to fifteen Andover police officers. Six 
Andover homebound elders were immunized in their homes and ninety residents were given influenza immunizations in the 
Health Department Clinic. 



Pneumovax 

1 
6 

sz 

59 



1 

10 
J4 

25 

99 

Blood lead screening information and referral was provided to Andover residents by the Public Health Nurse. 
Pediculosis screening, information and education as well as scabies information and education are provided by the nurse 
to residents and groups upon request 

Amblyopia screening clinics were offered by the Andona Society free of charge to children of Andover residents age 
two through five. A special vision test is given and children who failed the test were referred to an ophthalmologist for follow- 
up. 

Immunization review, health record review, storage of medication and other medical regulations affecting recreational 
camps for children are enforced through inspection and license withdrawal If the requirements are not met. 

Elderly Health Services 

This program is designed to promote and maintain health and prevent diseases in Andover's senior citizen 
population. Clinics are held at the housing for the elderly and at the Andover Commons on a monthly basis. Weekly clinics 
are held at the Senior Center. Tests include vital signs, urine testing, hemoglobin testing and weight. Each person receives 
counselling (diet, medication) and referral to physicians of area agencies as needed. 





Dohertv School Clinic 


Aoes 




Influenza 


20-44 




25 


45-64 




121 


>65 




654 




Total 


800 




Senior Center Clinic 


20-44 




9 


45-64 




82 


>65 




138 




Total 


229 


GRAND TOTAL 


1,140 



Outreach Clinics 


33 


457 attended 


Senior Center Clinics 


44 


652 attended 


Office Visits 


170 




Home Visits 


19 





An Easy Exercise Program was directed by Pat Wilson, R.N., Public Health Nurse, from January through April. It 
involved range of motion exercises, walking, dancing and health education. All participants were required to get permission 
from their physician and many do the exercises at home as well. There were twenty-one classes with four hundred and 
seventy-nine participants. 



37 



Biologies 

Andover does not offer immunization clinics to its residents but does provide biologies free of charge to Andover 
physicians and schools. The Public Health Nurse monitors distribution and usage of the vaccines. Some vaccines are 
ordered from the Department of Public Health and some are picked up by the nurse at the regional office in Tewksbury. 

Information to area clinics, school and physicians on various vaccines and those needed for international travel is 
provided by the Public Health Nurse and referral is made to vaccination sites. 

Planning Division 

The Planning Division is responsible for a wide range of activities involving residential, industrial, and commercial 
development in Andover through administration of the Town's land use regulations and controls. The division is responsible 
for processing the plans for nearly all new development in the Town. The division provides professional technical support 
to the Planning Board and the Zoning Board of Appeals as well as the Fair Housing Committee and the Housing Partnership 
Committee, The Planning Division also represents the Town on the Regional Housing Committee. In addition to these 
ongoing duties, the division provides professional staff support to a subcommittee of the Planning Board created to address 
planning issues involving the Central Andover area. Division staff assists the subcommittee in developing detailed 
recommendations on specific economic and land-use planning issues. Division staff also administers a Community 
Development Action Grant totalling $765,000 which was awarded to the Town for specific public improvements in the 
Shawsheen Village area. During 1991 the Planning Division began work on updating the Master Plan in response to 
amendments to State Law. Chapters of the plan have been presented to the Planning Board at various pubic meetings 
throughout the year. The Planning Division staff also made significant progress in 1991 in computerizing land-use records 
and permit issuance within the department. 

During 1991 the Planning Board held twenty-three meetings. Three Definitive Subdivision Plans were submitted with 
filing fees totalling $55,950; all three plans were granted approval, creating a total of one hundred eighty-seven new 
residential lots. Two requests for modification to previously approved Definitive Subdivision Plans were submitted; both were 
approved. Two Preliminary Plans were submitted; the Board approved one. Twenty-seven subdivision plans not requiring 
formal Planning Board approval, which involved nineteen new lots and totalled $845 in filing fees, were certified. Five 
subdivision performance guarantees totalling $288,410 were secured from developers. Three Parking Special Permits and 
two Site Plan Special Permits were submitted and approved by the Board. The Planning Board reported on twenty-four 
warrant articles for the 1991 Annual Town Meeting in April and on five articles for the Special Town Meeting in September. 
Eleven proposals for street acceptance were processed for the 1991 Town Meetings, four of which were accepted as public 
ways. Seven streets were taken by eminent domain at the April Town Meeting and one at the September Town Meeting. 

CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT COMMITTEE 

The Committee, which began meeting this past June, spent the summer months getting organized and reviewing 
current issues, particularly the economic condition and mix of retail uses in the downtown as well as parking. Two specific, 
initial efforts have also been undertaken by the committee. 

The first of these is the completion of a report on the results of a survey of downtown shoppers entitled "Market 
Research Analysis of Andover s Central Business District". The effort was initiated to learn more about the wishes and desires 
of Andover consumers for goods and services. The Committee was fortunate to be offered the services of a group of 
Merrimack College business students in performing the survey and producing the report. The study, which was completed 
in December, continues to receive enthusiastic praise from those who have reviewed it. 

The second major area of focus for the Committee has been the general issue of parking in the downtown. The 
Committee, after reviewing previous studies and recommendations of previous committees, decided to initially reconsider 
previous recommendations to improve parking facility signage. A set of recommendations regarding an improved parking 
signage scheme proposed by the Committee was endorsed by the Board of Selectmen. It is intended that this improvement 
scheme would lend a more unified appearance to the downtown area. It would also strengthen the identity of the area as 



38 



an integrated retail oriented shopping center and serve to reinforce the efforts of the current advertising campaign being 
conducted by the Andover Center Association. The blue "P" signs are now being installed with signs for the individual lots 
to follow. 

Finally, the Committee is currently working with existing business groups to develop a strategy to coordinate efforts 
to promote Andover's downtown. 

Zoning Board of Appeals 

The Andover Zoning Board of Appeals is authorized to function under the General Laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, Chapter 40A and 40B and the Town By-laws. The Board meets on the first Thursday of each month in 
Memorial Hall Library, Memorial Hall, Elm Square. Five regular members and four associate members are appointed by the 
Selectmen and serve without pay. The public hearings by the Board are the result of applications in the following areas: 

• For a variance from the requirements of the By-laws. 

• For a special permit under the By-Jaws. 

• By a person aggrieved by the decision of the Building 
Inspector or other administrative officer. 

• For permission to construct low or moderate income 
housing within the Town of Andover (Comprehensive Permit). 

Prior to hearings, applications are reviewed and pertinent plans and sketches requested, legal advertisements are 
published and abutters are notified as required by law. The public hearings are conducted by the Chairman in conformity 
with the Board of Appeals Rules and Regulations. Following the hearings, the members of the Board, when deemed 
necessary, view each property in question and hold a deliberation meeting thereafter, open to the public, at which time the 
Board discusses the petitions which have been heard. Based on their views and the evidence presented at the hearing, a 
decision is rendered, signed and filed with the Town Clerk. 

During 1991, the Board held twelve regular meetings and nineteen deliberation meetings. The Board considered 
forty-five petitions and approved thirty-six. There were seven applications withdrawn and two were dismissed. 

Wesley E. Whitney retired from the Board of Appeals on June 30, 1991. Mr. Whitney had been an active member 
of the Zoning Board for sixteen years and served as Chairman for twelve of those years. 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

The Andover Housing Authority was organized in June, 1948. Regular Meetings are held on the second Thursday 
of every month, and the annual meeting is held during the month of June. Meetings are conducted in the main office, on 
the second floor of the Recreation Hall In Stowe Court. 

At the annual meeting held on June 13, 1991 , Mary Jane Powell was re-elected to serve as Chairperson by the Board 
of Directors. The following officers were elected for a one year term: 

Mary Jane Powell • Chairperson 

Ronald Hajj - Vice Chairman 

Eileen Connolly • Treasurer 

John C. Hess - Asst. Treasurer 

Nancy M. Marcoux - Secretary 

In November, Mr. Hartly Burnham was appointed to the Board by Governor Weld. He replaces Francis A. McNulty 
who served as the Governor's appointee for the past five years. 



39 



The And over Housing Authority is funded under the Executive Office of Communities and Development (EOCD). 
The Town of Andover has absolutely no financial obligation in the construction or operation of these housing projects. 

Chapter 667 

The Andover Housing Authority manages 218 units of Elderly Housing which are located in Chestnut Court (42 units), 
Grand view Terrace (40 units), Frye Circle (96 units), and Stowe Court (40 units). The average monthly rent this year in the 
elderly units was $169.00. The income limits for elderly housing are: 

One person: $19,488.00 Two people: $22,272.00 

There is also an asset limit of $15,000.00 in order to qualify. During the past year, (1991), twenty-eight tenants 
moved into elderly housing. 

Chapter 200-1 

The Andover Housing Authority manages fifty-six units of Family Housing including two, three, and four bedroom 
units. The income limits for Family Housing are as follows: 

Two people: $22,272.00 Five people: $29,580.00 

Three people: 25,056.00 Six people : 31,320.00 

Four people: 27,840.00 Seven people: 33,060.00 

Eight people: $34,800.00 

The average monthly rent for 1991 was $305.00. During 1991, ten new families moved into Family Housing. 

Section 8 Housing Assistance Program (Federal Funds-HUD) 

The Andover Housing Authority has 59 Certificates under this Federally subsidized program, which permits 
participants to live in private accommodations, paying approximately 30% of their adjusted income toward rent. The income 
limits are as follows: 



1 person: 


$16,500.00 


5 people: 


$25,500.00 


2 people: 


$18,900.00 


6 people: 


$27,400.00 


3 people: 


$21,250.00 


7 people: 


$29,250.00 


4 people: 


$23,600.00 


8 people: 


$31,150.00 



The total rent for the apartment cannot exceed the Fair Market Rent for that size unit. The Fair Market Rent is mandated 
by HUD. Fair Market Rents are as follows: 

1 bedroom: $637.00 3 bedroom: $874.00 

2 bedroom: $764.00 4 bedroom: $972.00 

The Housing Authority pays the difference in rent directly to the landlord. The condition of the unit must meet basic housing 
standards, and is inspected annually. The Town of Andover receives full taxes from the participating property owner. All 
of the 59 Certificates allocated to the Andover Housing are under lease. The Andover Housing Authority also manages 43 
Section 8 Vouchers. Under the Voucher Program, participants are allowed greater flexibility in locating an apartment, since 
the FMR does not have to be adhered to. If a participant leased an apartment which exceeds the Fair Market Rent set for 
that size unit, the participant is responsible for paying the difference in rent. The Housing Authority will only subsidize the 
tenant based on the FMR. Presently this program is 100% leased. 



40 



Chapter 707 Rental Assistance Program (STATE FUNDS) 

The Housing Authority has thirty-one certificates which assist low income elderly and families under this program. 
The applicant pays approximately 27% of their adjusted income towards rent, (as compared with 30% under the Federal 
Program), and the Housing Authority pays the difference. There is a separate maximum rent schedule under the 707 
Program which is slightly lower the Section 8 FMR. This program is currently "frozen" and no certificates are being re-Issued 
at this time. 

Chapter 689 

This is the eighth year that Fidelity House has been In operation. It is located within the Memorial Circle Project 
adjacent to Rogers Brook and houses seven handicapped persons and one full-time counselor. The monthly rent received 
from Fidelity House in 1991 was $1,000.00. 

Accomplishments 

The major accomplishment of 1991 was the continuation of our modernization program. The final phase of this 
program included asbestos removal, new guttering, new doors and termite control in our Family Housing, and new shower 
valves and trash enclosures in our Elderly Housing. In addition, our oldest elderly complex, Chestnut Court, has a new fire 
alarm system. 




41 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 1 & 2. 1991 











WARRANT 




ACTION 


APPR. BY 


ART. NO. 


DESCRIPTION 


TAKEN 


ATTY. GEN. 


1 


Election 






2 


Election of all others not 
elected by ballot 






3 


Anticipated Borrowing 


Approved 




4 


Budget 


Approved 




5 


Ballot Question - 

2 1/2 Override (School) 


Passed 




6 


2 1/2 Override (Town) 


Withdrawn 




7 


Salaries of Elected Officals 


Approved 




8 


Grant Program 


Approved 




9 


Road Contracts 


Approved 




10 


Free Cash 


Withdrawn 




11 


Unexpended Appropriations 


Withdrawn 




12 


Chap. 90 Road Easements 


Approved 




13 


Unpaid Bills 


Withdrawn 




14 


Town Report 


Approved 




15 


Town Budget Transfers 


Approved 




16 


Worker's Compensation 


Approved 




17 


Conservation Fund - $12,210 


Approved 




18 


Property Tax Exemptions 


Approved 


• 


19 


Rescind Unissued Bonds 


Withdrawn 




20 


Vocational High School Grant 


Approved 




21 


Street Acceptance - 
Radcliffe Drive 


Not Laid Out 




22 


Street Acceptance - 
Fun Flight Circle 


Not Laid Out 




23 


Street Acceptance - 
Yard ley Road 


Not Laid Out 




24 


Street Acceptance - 
Xalia Circle 


Approved 




25 


Street Acceptance - 
Pole Hill Drive 


Approved 




26 


Street Acceptance - 
Hearthstone Place 


Not Laid Out 




27 


Street Acceptance - 

Keystone Way 


Not Laid Out 




28 


Street Acceptance - 
Zambom Terrace 


Approved 





42 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 1, & 2, 1991 



WARRANT 
ART. NO. 


DESCRIPTION 


ACTION 
TAKEN 


APPR. 

ATTY. 


BY 

GEI4, 


29 


Street Acceptance - 
Powers Road 


Approved 






30 


Sidewalk - Shawsheen Road 


Withdrawn 






31 


Master Plan - Status Report 


No Vote Required 




32 


Sidewalk - High Plain Road 


Defeated 






33 


Sidewalk - Beacon Street/ 
High Plain Road 


Withdrawn 






34 


Taping of Selectmen's Mtgs. 


Defeated 






35 


Eminent Domain - Haggetts 
Pond Road 


Approved 






36 


Official Town Warrant 


Defeated 






37 


Capital Improvement Program - 
Town Bylaw 


Approved 


May 23 


, 1991 


38 


Eminent Domain - Doric way, 
Odyssey Way, Nicoll Dr., 
Laconia Dr. , Mess in ia Dr. , 
Sparta Way & Acropolis Cir. 


Approved 






39 


Retirement Benefits - 
Statute Acceptance 


Approved 






40 


Physical Exams for Employees 
Over 70 Yrs. - Statute 
Acceptance 


Approved 






41 


Sewer Line - North Street/ 
Greenwood Road 


Approved 






42 


Water Main - Salem St. fc 
Jenkins Road 


Defeated 






43 


Storm Drains 


Approved 






44 


Fire Prevention - Town Bylaw 


Approved 


May 23 


, 1991 


45 


Convenience Stores - 
Zoning Bylaw 


Withdrawn 






46 


Amendment to Demolition Bylaw 


Approved 


May 23, 


, 1991 


47 


Water Conservation Committee 


Approved 






48 


Enhanced 911 - 

Statute Acceptance 


Approved 






49 


Amend Sect. Ill District 

Boundaries - Zoning Bylaw 


Defeated 






50 


Modification of Sewer Master 
Plan 


Withdrawn 







43 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - HARCH 25. 1991 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen on March 4, 
1991 the Inhabitants of said Town who are qualified to vote in 
Elections and Town Affairs to meet and assemble at the designated 
polling place. All eight precincts: Precinct One, Precinct Two, 
Precinct Three, Precinct Pour, Precinct Five, Precinct Six, 
Precinct Seven, Precinct Eight, are to vote at the Dunn Gymnasium, 
Andover High School, Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, on 

MONDAY, THB TWENTY -FIFTH DAY OF MARCH, 1991, 

at eight o'clock A.M. to eight o'clock P.M. to act upon the 
following articles t 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the 
Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of 
said Town to meet at the time and place and for the purposes stated 
in said warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on 
the Town Hall, on each schoolhouse, and in no less than five other 
public places where bills and notices are usually posted and by 
publication in the Andover TOWNSMAN. Said warrants have been 
posted and published fourteen days. 

Kenneth Arseneault 
Constable 

ARTICLE 1. Took up Article 1 and proceeded to vote Town Offices. 
The ballot boxes were found to be empty and registered 0000. The 
polls were opened at eight o'clock A.M. and closed at eight o'clock 
P.M. 

The total number of ballots cast was 4,990, viz: 

Prec. 1 - 587 Prec. 2 - 639 Prec. 3 - 600 Prec. 4 - 694 
Prec. 5 - 668 Prec. 6 - 568 Prec. 7 - 627 Prec. 8 - 607 

12345678 MODERATOR FOR ONE YEAR 



462 493 440 517 488 432 473 461 James D. Doherty 3766 

125 146 160 177 180 136 154 146 BLANKS 1224 

SELECTMEN - 

TWO FOR THREE YEARS 

295 348 311 366 304 293 311 285 James M. Barenboim 2513 

89 85 83 110 96 75 80 97 John Doyle 715 

218 254 181 262 268 236 264 264 Christine Holmes 1947 

271 281 295 303 297 261 274 296 Larry L. Larsen 2278 

183 169 199 198 211 170 197 166 Susan K. O'Neill 1493 

118 141 131 149 160 101 128 106 BLANKS 1034 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE - 
TWO FOR THREE YEARS 

248 273 258 268 286 236 325 244 Michael A. Frishman 2138 

330 326 309 386 327 303 289 320 Susan T. Poors 2590 

305 338 303 363 381 297 369 330 Susan E. Jenkins 2686 

182 208 193 232 216 172 180 216 John G. Wragg 1599 

109 133 137 139 126 128 91 104 BLANKS 967 



44 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MARCH 25. 1991 



GR. LAWR. REG. VOC. TECH. 
H. S. DISTRICT COMM. - 
2 fi_ ONE FOR THREE YEARS 



138 261 177 263 210 197 186 178 Milton N. Baker 1610 

347 298 304 322 326 257 304 330 Joseph Gleaaon 2488 

102 80 119 109 132 114 137 99 BLANKS 892 

ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY - 
ONE FOR FIVE YEARS 

428 454 399 469 424 372 408 410 Ronald C. Hajj 3364 

159 185 201 225 244 196 219 197 BLANKS 1626 

TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARO FREE 
SCHOOL - FIVE FOR THREE 
YEARS 

317 364 284 323 288 283 289 307 Earl G. Efinger 2455 

301 359 296 333 292 287 313 333 Robert A. Finlayson 2514 

322 371 302 356 316 298 311 330 Joan M. Levis 2606 

303 338 262 304 273 286 271 293 John R. Petty 2330 

320 369 295 389 356 321 309 335 Donna C. Ellsworth 2694 

1372 1394 1561 1765 1815 1365 1642 1437 BLANKS 12351 

After the final action on the preceding Article One, the said 
meeting shall stand adjourned by virtue of Chapter 39, Section 20 
of the Massachusetts General Laws, to April 1, 1991, at 7:00 P.M., 
at the Dunn Gymnasiuo, Andover High School, then and there to begin 
acting upon articles that follow in this warrant. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 1, 1991 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 2,038 
voters admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James D. Ooherty, 
Moderator, at 7:05 P.M. 

The opening prayer was offered by Rabbi Robert Goldstein of 
Temple Emanuel, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Salute to the flag was led by Selectman Gerald H. Silverman. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit 17 non-voters to the 
meeting. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking or food in 
the Dunn Gymnasium. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to dispense 
with the reading of the Warrant and the return of service of the 
Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the 
Moderator refer to the article by number and by subject matter. 



45 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 1. 1991 

ARTICLE 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, two Selectmen for 
three years, two members of the School Committee for three years, 
one member of the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical 
High School Oistrict Committee for three years, one member of the 
Andover Housing Authority for five years, and five members of the 
Trustees of Punchard Free School for three years. 

All the above candidates are to be voted for on one ballot. 
The polls will be open from 8:00 o'clock A.M. to 8:00 o'clock P.M. 

Town Clerk Randall L. Hanson announced the results of the 
election on March 25, 1991 and declared James D. Doherty as 
Moderator and that he had previously been sworn to the faithful 
performance of the duties of that office. 

The Town Clerk also declared that other successful candidates 
elected to their respective offices had been sworn to the faithful 
performance of the duties of their offices. 

James D. Doherty Moderator for One Year 

James M. Barenboim Selectman for Three Years 

Larry L. Larsen Selectman for Three Years 

Susan E. Jenkins School Committee for Three Years 

Susan T. Poore School Committee for Three Years 

Joseph Gleason Gr. Lawrence Reg. Voc. Tech. 

H. S. District Comm. for 
Three Years 

Ronald C. Hajj Andover Housing Authority for 

Three Years 

Earl G. E finger ) 

) 
Robert A. Pinlayson ) 

) Trustees of Punchard Free 

) 
Joan M. Lewis ) School for Three Years 

) 
John R. Petty ) 

) 
Donna C. Ellsworth ) 

ARTICLE 2. To elect all other officers not required by law to be 
elected by ballot. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that John R. 
Williams be elected Trustee of the Cornell Fund for three years. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from 
time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year 
beginning July 1, 1991, in accordance with the provisions of 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes 
therefore, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes 
as may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance 
with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

Upon motion and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 3 be 
approved as printed in the Warrant. 



46 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOW N MEETING - APRIL 1. 1991 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to determine what sums of 
money the Town will raise and appropriate, including appropriations 
from available funds, to defray charges and expenses of the Town, 
including debt and interest, and to provide for a reserve fund for 
the Fiscal Year beginning July 1, 1991, and ending June 30, 1992. 

A report by the Andover Finance Committee was read by Joanne 
Harden. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to raise and 
appropriate the following sums of money: 



1 PERSONAL SERVICES 



2 OTHER EXPENSES 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Including $173,200 in 
department receipts 



$2,064,127.00 



Including $3,000 for out- 
of-state travel and $108,810 
in department receipts 846,807.00 



Total Appropriated 
From Taxation 



2,910,934.00 
2,628,924.00 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



OTHER EXPENSES 



MUNICIPAL MAINTENANCE 

Including $64,952 from rental 

income and $35,000 from 

Cemetery interest incoae 1,571,414.00 



Including $25,000 from 
rental income 

Total Appropriated 

From Taxation 



1,163,752.00 
2,735,166.00 
2,610,214.00 



5 PERSONAL SERVICES 



6 OTHER EXPENSES 



PUBLIC SAFETY 

Including $66,500 from 
ambulance receipts 

Including $6,580 for 
out-of-state travel and 
$7 5,000 from ambulance 
receipts 

Total Appropriated 

From Taxation 



5,929,027.00 

476,952.00 
6,405,979.00 
6,264,479.00 



7 PERSONAL SERVICES 

8 OTHER EXPENSES 



PUBLIC WORKS 



Including $2,750 for 
out-of-state travel 

Total Appropriated 

From Taxation 



1,778,685.00 

4,763,690.00 
6,542,375.00 
6,542,375.00 



47 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 1. 1991 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



LIBRARY 

Including $59,760 from 
Merrimack Valley Library 
Consortium 



922,205.00 



10 OTHER SERVICES Including $700 for out-of- 
state travel; $19,771 from 
State Library Aid and $24,000 
from Merrimack Valley Library 
Consortium 387,429.00 

Amended Motion from floor: That Budget Item #9 be increased by 
$15,000 and Budget Item #10 be reduced by $15,000. 

Amended Motion was DEFEATED by a majority vote. 

Motion from floor: That the Library be required to be open on 
Sunday afternoons and closed on Monday mornings on a cost neutral 
basis. 



Motion was PASSED by a majority vote. 

Total Appropriated 
From Taxation 



1,309,634.00 
1,206,103.00 



11 COMPENSATION FUND 

12 RESERVE FUND 



UNCLASSIFIED 



Total Appropriated 
From Taxation 



10,000.00 
200,000.00 
210,000.00 
210,000.00 



ANDOVER PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

13 PERSONAL SERVICES 

14 OTHER EXPENSES Including $8,000 for 

out-of-state travel 

Total Appropriated 
From Taxation 



17,588,799.00 

3,946,068.00 
21,534,867.00 
21,534,867.00 



15 



GREATER Lawrence TECHNICAL HIGH, SCHOQL 

Total Appropriated 114,574.00 
From Taxation 114,574.00 



FIXED 

16 INTEREST EXPENSE 

17 BOND REDEMPTION 

18 STABILIZATION FUND 

19 INSURANCE EXPENSES 

20 UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 

21 RETIREMENT - PERSONAL SERVICES 

22 RETIREMENT - OTHER EXPENSES 

23 CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT 

24 NON-CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT 

25 RETIREMENT FUND 



2,504 

4,187 

60 

945 

100 

31 

13 

1,225 

78 

454 



,237.00 
,700.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 
,808.00 
,185.00 
,770.00 
,000.00 
,016.00 



48 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOW N MEETING - APRIL 1. 1991 

26 HEALTH INSURANCE FUND 2,633,306.00 

Including $50,000 from 
parking meter receipts for 
bond redemption and $98,500 
from special pension reserve 
for retirement fund 

Total Appropriated 12,233,022.00 

From Taxation 12,084,522.00 

TOTAL BUDGET APPROPRIATION $53,996,551.00 
TOTAL FROM TAXATION $53,196,058.00 

SPECIAL AR TICLES - FROM AVAILABLE FUNDS 

Article 47 Water Conservation Committee £ l. 000. 00 

Total $ 1,000.00 

SPECIAL ARTICLES - TRANSFER OF FUNDS 

Article 15 Budget Transfer FY 1991 $ 135,000.00 

To: Debt Service Bond Redemption 
From: Debt Service Interest 

Article 17 Conservation Fund 12 . 210.00 

Total $ 147,210.00 

SPECIAL ARTICLES - BORROWING 

Article 41 Sewer/North St. 6 Greenwood Rd. $ 280,000.00 

Article 43 Storm Drains 325. 000.00 

Total $ 605,000.00 

SPECIAL ARTICLES - TAXATION 

Article 5 Proposition 2-1/2 Override Ballot 
Question/Contingent Appropriation 

School Personal Services $ 1,403,349.00 

School Other Expenses 96 . 651.00 

Total $1,500,000.00* 

A true record 
ATTEST 



Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



* Defeated at May 6, 1991 Special Election 
2826 - YES 5311 - NO 



49 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 1. 1991 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town vill vote to raise by taxation and 
appropriate the sua of $1,500,000.00 for the Andover Public Schools 
for the Fiscal Year beginning with July 1, 1991 contingent upon 
subsequent approval of a ballot question allowing the Town of 
Andover to assess an additional $1,500,000.00 in Real Estate and 
Personal Property Taxes. 

Upon notion nade and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town 
vote to raise by taxation the sun of $1,500,000.00 and appropriate 
the sum of $1,403,349.00 for Personal Services and $96,651.00 for 
Other Expenses to the Andover Public Schools for the Fiscal Year 
beginning July 1, 1991, contingent upon subsequent approval of a 
ballot question allowing the Town of Andover to assess an 
additional $1,500,000.00 in Real Estate and Personal Property 
Taxes . 

A report by the Finance Committee was given by Edward Weil. 

A standing vote was requested. 

THE VOTE YES - 897 NO - 738 

Article 5 PASSED by a MAJORITY VOTE. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation the 
sua of $300,000 and appropriate $300,000 for repairs and 
reconstruction of roads by a capital expenditure exclusion for the 
Fiscal Year beginning July first, nineteen hundred and ninety-one, 
contingent upon subsequent approval of a ballot question allowing 
the Town of Andover to assess an additional $300,000 in Real Estate 
and Personal Property Taxes. 

Article 6 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 7. To establish the salaries of the elected officers for 
the ensuing year. 

Upon motion nade and duly seconded it was VOTED that the 
salaries of the elected Town Officers be established as follows: 

Town Moderator - $125.00 for each Annual Town Meeting and 

$30.00 for each Special Town Meeting 
except when it falls within the Annual 
Town Meeting. 

Selectman - Chairman - $1,500.00 

Members - $1,200.00 

School Committee - Chairman - $1,500.00 

Members - $1,200.00 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen and/ or the Town Manager to apply for, accept and enter 
into contracts from tine to tine for the expenditure of any funds 
allotted to Andover by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or the U. 
S. Government under any State or Federal grant program. 

Upon notion nade and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 

8 be approved as printed in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town 
Manager to enter into a contract with the Massachusetts Department 
of Public Works Commissioners, the County Commissioners and/or 
either of them for the construction and maintenance of public 
highways in the Town of Andover for the ensuing year. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 

9 be approved as printed in the Warrant. 



50 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 1. 1991 

ARTICLE 10. To see what amount the Town will vote to permit the 
Assessors to use in free cash to reduce the 1991-92 tax rate and to 
effect appropriations voted at the 1991 Annual Town Meeting. 

Article 10 was WITHDRAWN . 

ARTICLE 11. To see what disposition shall be made of unexpended 
appropriations and free cash in the treasury. 

Article 11 was withdrawn. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded, it 
was VOTED to adjourn at 10:30 P.M. until Tuesday, April 2, 1991 at 
7:00 P.M. at the Dunn Gymnasium on s haws he en Road. 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 2. 1991 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 513 
voters admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James D. Doherty, 
Moderator, at 7:25 P.M. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit 13 non-voters to the 

meeting. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town to 
acquire any necessary easements by gift, by purchase or by right of 
eminent domain for Chapter 90 Highway Construction. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 
12 be approved as printed in the Warrant. 

The VOTE UNANIMOUS. More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from 
available funds a sum not to exceed $5,000 to pay unpaid bills for 
which obligation was incurred in prior Fiscal Years. 

Article 13 was WITHDRAWN. 

ARTICLE 14. To act upon the report of the Town officers. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 

14 be approved as printed in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum not to 
exceed $500,000.00 from amounts previously appropriated at the June 
11, 1990, Annual Town Meeting as authorized by. Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 33B. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 

15 be approved as printed in the Warrant. 

ARTICIE 16. To see of the Town will vote to accept the provisions 
of MGL Chapter 40, Section 13C, to establish a worker's 
compensation claims reserve fund. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 

16 be approved as printed in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of 
$12,210 from the Wetlands Piling- Fees- account to be appropriated to 
the Conservation Fund. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 

17 be approved as printed in the Warrant. 



51 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 2. 1991 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions 
of Section 4, Chapter 73 of the Acts of 1986 as amended by Chapter 
126 of the Acts of 1988 to allow an additional property tax 
exemption for Fiscal year 1992 to allow those persons who qualify 
for property tax exemptions under Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 59, Section 5. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 
18 be approved as printed in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to rescind unissued bond 
authorizations from prior Town Meetings or take any other action 
related thereto. 

Article 19 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to approve the acceptance 
by the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High School 
District of (1) Chapter 70A of the General laws relating to an 
Equal Educational Opportunity Grant. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 
20 be approved as x printed in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a 
public way, Radcliffe Drive, as shown on a plan approved by the 
Andover Planning Board, as shown on a plan entitled "Definitive 
Plan of Belmont Park in Andover, Mass." dated June 8, 1973 and 
recorded with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 
6985. 

On petition of Arthur E. Fosse and others. 

Article 21 was WITHDRAWN . NOT LAID OUT 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a 
public way, Fun Flight Circle, as shown on a plan approved by the 
Andover Planning Board, as shown on a plan entitled "Subdivision 
Plan of Land in Andover, Massachusetts of Fun Flight Circle", Date: 
March 24, 1989 *Revised: May 3, 1989, and recorded with Essex North 
District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 11630. 

On petition of Arthur E. Fosse and others. 

Article 22 was WITHDRAWN . NOT LAID OUT 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a 
public way, Yardley Road, as shown on a plan approved by the 
Andover Planning Board, as shown on a plan entitled "Definitive 
Plan of Belmont Park in Andover, Mass." dated June 8, 1973 and 
recorded with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 
6985. 

On petition of Arthur E. Fosse and others. 

Article 23 was WITHDRAWN . NOT LAID OUT 

ARTICLE 24. To petition the Andover Town Meeting to accept as a 
public way Kalia Circle as shown on a plan entitled "Street Layout 
and Acceptance Plan -Kalia Circle", Andover, Massachusetts, dated 
December 17, 1990. Said plan is on file with the Planning Board. 

On petition of Linda A. O'Connell and others. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by John 
O'Brien. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 
24 be approved as printed in the Warrant. 



52 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 2. 1991 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a 
public way, Pole Hill Drive, as shown on a plan entitled 
"Definitive Plan of Waterford Place, Subdivision Plan of land in 
Andover, MA, of Pole Hill Drive, dated April 7, 1982, which Plan is 
recorded at the Essex North Registry of Deeds as Plan 8906. 

On petition of Reginald L. Harden and others. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by John 
O'Brien. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 
25 be approved as printed in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a 
public way, Hearthstone Place, as shown on a plan which was 
approved by the Planning Board, said way being shown on a plan of 
land entitled "Definitive Plan of Hearthstone Village, Subdivision 
Plan of Land in Andover, Mass. of Hearthstone Place." Said plan 
being recorded with the Essex North Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 
10807. 

On petition of Reginald L. Marden and others. . 

Article 26 was WITHDRAWN . NOT LAID OUT 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a 
public way, Keystone Way, as shown on a plan which was approved by 
the Planning Board, said way being shown on a plan of land entitled 
"Definitive Plan of Hearthstone Village, Subdivision Plan of Land 
in Andover, Mass. of Keystone Way." Said plan being recorded with 
the Essex North Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 11021. 

On petition of Reginald L. Marden and others. 

Article 27 was WITHDRAWN . NOT LAID OUT 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a 
public way, Zambon Terrace, as shown on a plan which was approved 
by the Planning Board, said way being shown on a plan of land 
entitled "Zambom Terrace, a Residential Subdivision in Andover, 
Mass., Owner and Applicant: Zaida Zambon, 221 Haggetts Pond Road, 
Andover, Massachusetts, Date: Dec. 1987, Engineers and Consultants: 
DiPrete-Marchionda & Assoc, Inc., 80 Maple Street, Stonehan, MA 
02180," said plan recorded in the Essex North District 
Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 11229. 

On petition of Peter J. Caruso and others. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was made by John 
O'Brien. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 

28 be approved as printed in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way 
and name Powers Road as approved by the Planning Board and laid out 
by the Board of Selectmen as shown on a plan entitled: "Definitive 
Plan of Mill Dam Estates Subdivision Plan of Land in Andover, 
Mass." Dated October 21, 1985, and revised December 2, 1985, and 
January 15, 1986, prepared by Dana F. Perkins and Associates, Inc., 
which Plan is recorded with the North District of Essex Registry of 
Deeds as Plan No. 10577. 

On petition of Andrew A. Caffrey and others. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by John 
O'Brien. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 

29 be approved as printed in the Warrant. 

53 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 2. 1991 

ARTICLE 30. To sea if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or by any combination 
of the foregoing and appropriate the sua of $126,500 for the 
purpose of constructing a new bituminous concrete sidewalk with new 
granite curb on the northerly side of Shawsheen Road from the High 
School entrance to Lowell Street. 

Article 30 was WITHDRAWN . 

ARTICLE 31. To hear and discuss the Planning Board's status report 
of the overdue update of the 1965 Master Plan, as required by the 
vote of the 1988 Annual Town Meeting (Article 71) . 

On petition of Margaret R. Cronin and others. 

A motion was made by Margaret R. Cronin that the Tdwn hear and 
discus* the Planning Board's status report of the overdue update of 
the 1965 Master Plan, as required by the vote of the 1988 Annual 
Town Meeting (Article 71) . 

A status report by the Andover Planning Board was read by 

Susan G. Stott. 

NO VOTE REQUIRED. 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $15,000.00 for the construction of a 
bituminous concrete sidewalk on the northerly side of High Plain 
Road from existing sidewalk on Spencer Court to existing sidewalk 
leading into West Elementary School. 

On petition of Steven P. Neri and others. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Susan 
Stott. 

A report by the Andover Finance Committee was read by Peter 
Volpe. 

Article 32 was DEFEATED by a majority vote. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or by any combination 
of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $144,000.00 for the 
purpose of constructing a new bituminous concrete sidewalk with new 
granite curb on Beacon Street along the easterly side from Lowell 
Street to High Plain Road and along the westerly side from High 
Plain Road to Chandler Road. 

Article 33 was withdrawn . 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and 
appropriate a sum not to exceed $4,000.00 for the first year's 
operation, and to require that, henceforth, all regular and special 
meetings .of the Board of Selectmen of the Town of Andover shall be 
recorded officially in their entirety by means of a tape recorder 
or by other means of sonic reproduction, from the resulting 
recording of which copies and transcripts shall be made available 
to the public at no greater than actual cost. 

On petition of John Doyle and others. 

A motion was made and duly seconded to approve Article 34 as 
printed in the Warrant. 

Article 34 was DEFEATED by a majority vote. 

A request was made for a standing vote. 

Article 34 was DEFEATED . YES - 161 NO - 229 



54 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL T OWN MEETING - APRIL 2, 1991 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire by purchase or gift or to take by eminent 
domain for highway purposes a 2,406 square foot parcel of land at 
the northwest corner of Haggetts Pond Road and Lowell Street, 
marked Parcel "A" on Plan Ho. 11776 recorded at Essex North 
District Deeds, more particularly described as follows, bounded 

Northeasterly by Haggetts Pond Road One Hundred Fifty and 
48/100 (150.48) feet; and, 

Southerly by Lowell Street Seventy-seven and 31/100 (77.31) 
feet; and, 

Westerly by Parcel "B" shown on said Plan No. 11776 on three 
courses one hundred forty-two and 4/100 (142.04*) feet. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by John 
O'Brien. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 
35 be approved as printed in the Warrant. 

THE VOTE UNANIMOUS More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to require that, 
henceforth, the Selectmen shall provide each voter of the Town of 
Andover with an official copy of the Warrant for any annual or 
special Town Meeting, to be used for the conduct of the business of 
such Town Meeting, and stating the time and place of holding the 
meeting and the subjects to be acted upon thereat, in compliance 
with Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 39, Section 10; such 
document to be devoid of editorial comment, recommendations and 
statements of approval or disapproval of any kind. 

On petition of John Doyle and others. 

Article 36 was DEFEATED by a majority vote. 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town Bylaws 
by adding the following: 

CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM 

A. Preparation and Submission 

The Town Manager annually shall prepare with the assistance of 
the Town Planning Board a five-year capital improvement program. 
At the request of the Town Manager, all Town boards, committees, 
commissions, and other agencies of the Town shall submit to the 
Manager in such form and according to such schedule of time as the 
Manager may require, detailed statements of capital improvements 
requested for their respective boards, committees, commissions, and 
agencies during the next five fiscal years. The Manager shall 
submit the five-year capital improvement program to the Board of 
Selectmen at least three months prior to the final date for 
submission of the annual budget as prescribed by Town Bylaw. 
Concurrently, copies of the capital improvement program shall also 
be transmitted to the Finance Committee and School Committee. The 
capital improvement program shall Include: • 

1. A clear general summary of its contents; 

2. A list of all capital improvements which are proposed to be 
undertaken during the five fiscal years ensuing, with 
appropriate supporting information as to the necessity for 
such improvements; 

3. Cost estimates, method of financing and recommended time 
schedules for each such improvement; and, 

4. The estimated annual cost of operating and maintaining any 
facilities to be constructed or acquired. 



55 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 2. 1991 

Article 37 Cont. 

The above information may be revised and extended each year 
with regard to capital improvements still pending or in process of 
construction or acquisition. 

B. Action on Capital Improvement Program 

1. Notice and Hearing . The Board of Selectmen shall cause to be 
published in one or more newspapers of general circulation in the 
Town the general summary of the capital improvement program and a 
notice stating: (a) the times and places where copies of the 
capital improvement program are available for inspection; and (b) 
the time and place, not less than two weeks after such publication, 
for a public hearing on the capital improvement program. 

2. After the public hearing but at least ten days before adoption 
of the capital improvement program, the Board of Selectmen shall 
meet and confer with the Pinance Committee concerning the program. 

3. Adoption . The Board of Selectmen by resolution shall adopt 
the capital improvement program with or without amendment after the 
public hearing and after conferring with the Finance Committee, at 
least one month before the required date for submission of the 
annual budget by the Town Manager. 

On petition of Richard J. Bowen and others. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Hooks 
Johnston . 

A report, by the Andover Finance Committee was read by Donald 
Robb. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 
37.be approved as printed in the Warrant and that the Town Clerk be 
allowed to assign the proposed by-law its proper number. 

ARTICLE 38. To authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by eminent 
domain the fee in the streets known as Doric Way, Odyssey Way, 
Nicoll Drive, Laconia Drive, Messinia Drive, Sparta Way, and 
Acropolis Circle, all as shown on a plan entitled Olympic Village 
dated October 23, 1980, prepared by Dana F. Perkins & Assoc, Inc. 
and recorded at the North Essex Registry of Deeds as plan number 
8556, together with utility and drainage easements shown on said 
plan, and for the purpose of acquiring these streets as public ways 
for the Town. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Hooks 
Johnston. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 

38 be approved as printed in the Warrant. 

THE VOTE UNANIMOUS More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to accept Section 90G 3/4 
of Chapter 32 of the Massachusetts General Laws which will allow 
Town employees working beyond the age of 70 to continue to accrue 
full retirement benefits. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 

39 be approved as printed in the Warrant. . 



56 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 2. 1991 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to accept Section 90J of 
Chapter 32 of the Massachusetts General Laws which will authorize 
the Retirement Board to pay for the required annual physical exam 
for those Town employees working beyond the age of 70. 

Upon notion aade and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 
40 be approved as printed in the Warrant* 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer -froa available funds, by borrowing or by any coabination 
of the foregoing and appropriate a sua not to exceed $280,000.00 
for the installation of an eight inch sanitary sewer line in North 
Street froa Webster Street to Joseph Street for approximately 2,000 
feet and Greenwood Road froa North Street southerly for 
approximately 1,000 feet. Betterments are to be assessed. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by John 
O'Brien. 

A report by the Andover Finance Committee was read by Peter 
Volpe. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum 
of $280,000.00 be hereby appropriated for the installation of an 
eight-inch sanitary sewer line in North Street froa Webster Street 
to Joseph Street for approximately 2,000 feet and Greenwood Road 
from North Street southerly for approximately 1,000 feet; that to 
raise this appropriation the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, is authorized to borrow not exceeding $280,000.00 under 
and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(1) of the Massachusetts 
General Laws, as amended and supplemented, or any other enabling 
authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor; and 
that betterments shall be assessed in connection with the project. 

The VOTE YES - 289 NO - 97 More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or by any combination 
of the foregoing and appropriate the sua of $450,000.00 for the 
purpose of laying eight inch or twelve inch water mains in Salem 
Street from Wethersfield Drive to Jenkins Road, Wagon Wheel Road 
and Jenkins Road from Salem Street to the North Andover Town line. 
Betterments are to be assessed. 

On petition of John A. Marshall and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum 
of $450,000.00 be hereby appropriated for the purpose of laying 
eight inch or twelve inch water mains in Salem Street from 
Wethersfield Drive to Jenkins Road, and in Wagonwheel Road and 
Jenkins Road froa Salem Street to the North Andover town line; that 
to raise this appropriation the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectaen, is authorized to borrow not exceeding $450,000.00 under 
and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 8(5) of the Massachusetts 
General Laws, as amended and suppleaented, or any other enabling 
authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor; and 
that betterments shall be assessed in connection with this project. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Susan 
Stott. 

A report by the Andover Pinance Committee was read by Virginia 
Xeaton. 

The VOTE More than 2/3 required. 

YES '15 NO - The petitioner waived the count. 

Article 42 was DEFEATED, 



57 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 2. 1991 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or by any combination 
of the foregoing and appropriate a sun not to exceed $325,000 for 
the purpose of installing storm drains; and to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to acquire the necessary drainage easements by gift, 
by purchase or by seizure by right of eminent domain. 

A report by the' Andover Planning Board was read by Hooks 
Johnston. 

A report by the Andover Finance Committee was read by Peter 
Volpe. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum 
of $325,000.00 be hereby appropriated for the purpose of installing 
storms drains, including the cost of drainage easement's and other 
expenses incidental and related thereto; that to raise this 
appropriation the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, is 
authorized to borrow not exceeding $325,000.00 under and pursuant 
to Chapter 44, Section 7(1) of the Massachusetts General Laws, as 
amended and supplemented, or any other enabling authority, and to 
issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor; and that the Board of 
Selectmen is authorized to acquire the necessary drainage easements 
by gift, by purchase or by seizures by right of eminent domain. 

The VOTE YES - 346 NO - 31 More than 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will amend the Town Bylaws, Article 
X, to adopt The Commonwealth of Massachusetts Board of Fire 
Prevention Regulations (527 CMR]; Massachusetts General Law Chapter 
148; and The Massachusetts State Building Code (780 CMR] in place 
of the 1970 edition of the National Fire Code presently in force 
under that article. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by John 
O'Brien. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 
44 be approved as printed in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, Article VIII of the Town Bylaws as follows or take any 
action thereto on the above two Sections: 

1. By deleting subsection 1V.B.11 in its entirety and substituting 
the following: 

"1V.B.11. SRA SRB SRC APT SC OP GB MV 1G 1A ID 
N N N NBANYYYNBA 



Establishment for the retail 
sale of merchandise, or for 
the sale of such merchandise 
other than at retail if incidental 
to the operation of a retail 
establishment, including processing 
and/or assembly of merchandise when 
clearly accesso -y to the sale of 
such merchandise on the premises". 



58 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWH MEETING - APRIL 2. 1991 

Article 45 Cont. 

2. By deleting subsection 1V.B.11A in its entirety and 
substituting the following: 

"1V.B.11A SRA SRB SRC APT SC OP GB MV 1G 1A ID 
N N N NNHBABANNBA 

Convenience Store, which shall 
mean commercial establishment 
whose principal purpose is to 
serve a variety of day-to-day 
domestic or personal consumption 
needs, including but not limited 
to the sale of all or one of the 
following items: household goods, 
cleaning, meat or food products, 
bakery goods, flowers, newspapers, 
periodicals, pharmaceuticals, dairy 
products, and beverages. This does 
not include the sale of alcoholic 
beverages. Such establishment: 

(a) not to exceed a usable floor 
area of 3500 sq. ft. for retail use, 

(b) having extended hours of operation, 
and (c) having a high turnover of 
customers per hour. 

On petition of Ruth w. Hoffman and others. 

A motion was made and seconded to AMEND Article 45 by deleting 
paragraph 1 as proposed in the original Article and to AMEND 
paragraph 2 to read as follows: 

2. By deleting subsection 1V.B.11A in its entirety and 
substituting the following: 

"1V.B.11A. SRA SRB SRC APT SC OP GB KV IG LA ID 
N N N NNNBABANNBA 

Convenience store, which shall 
mean commercial establishment 
whose principal purpose is to 
serve a variety of day-to-day 
domestic or personal consumption 
needs, including but not limited 
to the sale of all or one of the 
following items: household goods, 
meat or food products, bakery goods, 
flowers, newspapers, periodicals, 
pharmaceuticals, dairy products, 
and beverages, which does not 
include the sale of alcoholic 
beverages; and a cleaner of 
clothing establishment. Such 
establishments (a) not to exceed 
a usable floor area of 3500 sq. ft. 
for retail use, (b) having extended 
hours of operation, and (c) having a 
high turnover of customers per hour. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Susan 
Stott. 

The motion was WITHDRAWN before a count was taken. 



59 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 2. 1991 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of 
Andover Code of By-Lavs, Article XII, Section 33, Demolition of 
Historically Significant Buildings and Structures, as follows: 

By adding to Subsection 6, Non-Compl iance . the following: 

"Anyone who demolishes/ removes a building or structure identified 
in Section Three (3) without first obtaining, and complying fully 
with, the provisions of a demolition permit in accordance with the 
provisions of this bylaw shall be subject to a fine of not more 
than $300.00.** 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 
46 be approved as printed in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to establish a WATER 
CONSERVATION COMMITTEE composed of seven members to be appointed by 
the Town Manager, said committee to prepare and to assist in the 
implementation of, a long-term town water conservation program by 
the 1993 Annual Town Meeting; and to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds or any combination of the foregoing and 
appropriate the sum of $1,000.00 to meet the ordinary expenses of 
the committee; or' take any other action relating thereto. 

On petition of Richard J. Bowen and others. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by John 
O'Brien. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town 
vote to establish a WATER CONSERVATION COMMITTEE composed of seven 
members to be appointed by the Town Manager, said committee to 
prepare and to assist in the implementation of, a long-term town 
water conservation program by the 1993 Annual Town Meeting; and to 
raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds or any 
combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $1,000.00 
from available funds. 

Article 47 was APPROVED by a majority vote. 

ARTICLE 48. To see whether or not the Town will vote to accept the 
provisions of Chapter 291 of the Acts of 1990, thereby allowing the 
Town to receive enhanced 911 service as defined in said Act and, if 
acceptance and notification to the Secretary of the Commonwealth of 
said acceptance occur on or before December 11, 1991, the Town will 
also receive, at no cost to it, the benefits of enhanced 911 
network features and network components, including at least one 
public safety answering point, and any other enhanced 911 network 
features that may be made available by the statewide emergency 
telecommunications board. 

A report by the Andover Finance Committee was read by Donald 
Schroeder. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 
48 be approved as printed in the Warrant. 



60 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 2. 1991 

ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover 
Zoning Bylaw in Section III District Boundaries (and make the 
appropriate changes in the Zoning Map of Andover, Massachusetts) to 
extend the Industrial D (ID) District by changing from Single 
Residence C (SRC) to Industrial D (ID) certain parcels of land 
situated on Osgood Street and Frontage Road and being shown as Lots 
3 0A, 30B, and 30T, on Town of Andover Assessors* Map 179. 

On petition of Richard G. Asoian and others. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Hooks 
Johnston. 

The VOTE More than the 2/3 required 
YES - 187 NO - 180 

Article 49 was DEFEATED . 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to modify the Sewer 
Master Plan to include parcels of land designated on Assessors' 
Maps as Parcels 11, 15, and ISA on Map 156, Parcel 2 on Map 157. 

On petition of Andrew A. Caffrey and others. 

Article 50 was WITHDRAWN . 

* 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded it 
was VOTED to dissolve the 1991 Annual Town Meeting at 11:18 P.M. 

ATTEST 



^f&nLjUjUs/^ /^Oa^fiS 



Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



61 



SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION - MAY 6, 1991 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen on April 2, 
1991 the Inhabitants of said Town who are qualified to vote in 
Elections and Town Affairs met and assembled at the designated 
polling place. All eight precincts: Precinct One, Precinct Two, 
Precinct Three, Precinct Four, Precinct Five, Precinct Six, 
Precinct Seven, Precinct Eight, are to vote at the Dunn Gymnasium, 
Andover High School, Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, on 

MONDAY, THE SIXTH DAT OF MAY, 1991, 

at eight o'clock A.M. to eight o'clock P.M. to act upon the 
following Question: 

QUE8TI0N 1. OVERRIDE QOB8TIOMI ANDOVER SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

Shall the Town of Andover be allowed to assess an 
additional $1,500,000.00 in Real Estate and Personal 
Property Taxes for the purposes of adding to the 
operating budget of the Andover Public Schools 
$1,403,349.00 for Personal Services and $96,651.00 
for. Other Expenses for the fiscal year beginning July 
first, nineteen hundred and nintey-one? 

Yes No 



Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the 
Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of 
said Town to meet at the time and place and for the purposes stated 
in said warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on 
the Town Hall, on each schoolhouse, and in no less than five other 
public places where bills and notices are usually posted. Said 
Warrants have been posted and published fourteen days. 

John F. Manning 
Constable 

The ballot boxes were found to be empty and registered 0000. 
The polls were opened at eight o'clock A.M. and closed at eight 
o'clock P.M. The total number of ballots cast was 8,154, viz: 



_9_ QVESTIQE 1, 



274 279 327 323 429 369 465 360 YES 2826 

580 651 622 741 691 699 627 700 NO 5311 

5231-- 15 BLANKS 17 



A true record, 
ATTEST 



Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



62 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - SEPTE MBER 30. 1991 



WARRANT 
ART. NO. 


DESCRIPTION 


ACTION 
TAKEN 


APPR. BY 
ATTY. GEN. 




FY 92 Budget Reductions 


Approved 






Sever Budget Reduction 


Approved 






Library Sunday Openings 


Approved 






Teacher Salary Deferral 


Withdrawn 






Zoning Bylaw Amendment - 
Yard Sales/Garage Sales 


Approved 
Amended 


December 3, 




Street Acceptance - 
Rogers Brook East 


Approved 






Lowell Street Sidewalk 


withdrawn 






Lincoln Street Sidewalk 


Defeated 






Zoning Bylaw Amendment - 
Mausoleums 


Withdrawn 




10. 


Zoning Bylaw Amendment - 


Defeated 





Unregistered Vehicles 



63 



flPECIAL TOWN MEETING - SEPTEMBER 30. 1991 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen, September 11, 1991, 
the Inhabitants of said Town who are qualified to vote in Town 
Affairs to meet and assemble at the J. Everett Collins Center for 
the Performing Arts on Shavsheen Road, in said Andover, 

MONDAY, THE THIRTIETH DAY 07 SEPTEMBER, 1991, 
at 7:00 o'clock, P.M., to act upon the following articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the 
Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of 
said Town to meet at the time and place and for the purposes stated 
in said warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on 
the Town Hall, on each schoolhouse, and in no less than five other 
public places where bills and notices are usually posted and by 
publication in the Andover TOWNSMAN. Said warrants have been 
posted and published fourteen days. 

John F. Manning 
Constable 



The checklists were used at the entrance and showed 617 voters 
admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James D. Ooherty, Moderator, at 
7: 10 p.m. 

The opening prayer was offered by Rev. Dr. Calvin F. Muti of South 
Church, Andover Massachusetts. 

A salute to the flag was led by Selectman Gerald H. Silverman. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit 15 non-voters to the meeting. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking or food in the 
Collins Center. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to dispense with 
the reading of the Warrant and return of service of the Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Moderator 
refer to the article by number and subject matter. 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article 4 as 
voted at the April 1, 1991, Annual Town Meeting, which made 
appropriations for the Fiscal Year beginning July 1, 1991, and 
ending June 30, 1992. 

A report by the Finance Committee was made by Donald Robb. 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a majority vote 
to amend Article 4 as voted at the April 1, 1991 Annual Town 
Meeting, which made appropriations for the Fiscal Year beginning 
July 1, 1991 and ending June 30, 1992 by reducing the sum of 
$670,000.00 from the following line items: 

Line 4 Municipal Maintenance - Other Expenses $200,000 

Line 8 Public Works - Other Expenses 78,000 

Line 14 Andover Public Schools - Other Expenses 117,000 

Line 16 Debt Service - Interest 121,000 

Line 19 Insurance Expense 79,000 

Line 20 Unemployment 40,000 

Line 25 Retirement Fund 35.000 

$670,000 



64 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - SEPTEMBER 30. 1991 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to reduce a sum of 
$130,874.00 from Fiscal Year 1992 Public Works - Other Expenses 
appropriation, said sum representing a reduction in the Greater 
Lawrence Sanitary District assessment to the Town of Andover. 

A report by the Finance Committee was made by Donald Robb. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a majority vote 
to reduce a sum of $130,874.00 from Fiscal Year 1992 Public Works 
Other Expenses appropriation, said sum representing a reduction in 
the Greater Lawrence Sanitary District assessment to the Town of 
Andover. 



ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of 
$14,500.00 from Fiscal Year 1992 Library - Other Expenses 
appropriation and appropriate to Fiscal Year 1992 Library - 
Personal Services. 

A report by the Finance Committee was made by Joanne Marden. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a majority vote 
to transfer a sum of $14,500.00 from Fiscal Year 1992 Library - 
Other Expenses appropriation and appropriate to the fiscal year 
1992 Library - Personal Services. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to reject the 
provisions of Section 231 of the Acts of 1991 and of the fifth 
sentence of Section 40 of Chapter 71 as amended by the Section 230 
of the Acts of 1991. 

ARTICLE 4 was WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, 
Article VIII of the Town Bylaws, as follows: 

(1) By adding the following subsection 52 to Section IV. B. , Table 
of Use Regulations: 

"52. Temporary uses clearly accessory and incidental to the 
permitted residential use, including, but not limited to yard 
sales, garage sales, barn sales, estate sales, craft sales and 
like activities, subject to the provisions of Section VI. S. of 
this Bylaw. Activities which do not conform to the provisions 
of Section VI. S. may be permitted by the Zoning Board of 
Appeals by Special Permit per Section VIII. C. 3. 

SRA SRB SRC APT SC OP GB MU IG IA IG 
Y Y Y Y YYYYYYY", and, 

(2) By adding the following Section VI. S. : 

"VI.S. Yard sales, estate sales, garage sales, craft sales 
and barn sales: The temporary use of residential premises for 
sale of second-hand articles, antiques, crafts and other items 
of like character generally found or produced in a residential 
dwelling may be permitted subject to a. permit granted by the 
Inspector of Buildings. To ensure that such events are in 
keeping with the residential nature of the surrounding 
neighborhood, the following provisions shall apply: 

a. A permit shall be issued by the Inspector of Buildings for 
up to two consecutive days only and shall be. limited to two 
permits per calendar year for any given premises. The 
application for a permit shall be made no' lesa than seven (7) 
calendar days prior to the date of the event. Said permit 
shall be available on the premises during the term of the sale. 



65 



SPECIAL TQWH MEETING = SEPTEMBER 30. 1991 

b. The Inspector of Buildings shall notify the Andover Police 
Department- of the location of such activities in the event 
that parking, traffic, and pedestrian safety become a public 
safety concern." 

A report by the Planning Board was given by John O'Brien. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to strike Article 
5 as it appears in the Warrant and substitute therefore the 
following: 

"52. The temporary use of residential premises for sale of crafts 
subject to a permit issued by the Inspector of Buildings for up to 
two consecutive days only and limited to two permits per calendar 
year for any given premises. 



8RA 


8KB 


8RC 


APT 


8C 


OP 


OB 


MU 


10 


IA 


ID 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


yn 



The VOTE was UMAMZM0U8 - MORS THAU 2/3 VOTE REQUIRED. 

X 

ARTICLE *. To see if the Town will vote to take by eminent domain 
and name as a public way, Rogers Brook East, completed by the Town 
after bond default and as shown on a plan which was approved by the 
Andover Planning Board on 8/14/79, said way being shown on a plan 
entitled "Subdivision ft Acceptance Plan Rogers Brook Andover, MA., 
Scale 1" - 40', May, 1978", prepared by Merrimack Engineering 
Service and shown on Plan #8170 recorded in the Essex North 
District Registry of Deeds. 

A report from the Planning Board was made by Hooks Johnston, Jr.. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
6 as printed in the Warrant 

The VOTE was UHAHIM0U8 - MORS THAN 2/3 VOTE REQUIRED 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to raise by 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or by any 
combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $192,000.00 
for the purpose of constructing a new bituminous concrete sidewalk 
with new granite curb on Lowell Street along the southerly side 
from Main Street to Shawsheen Road. 

On petition of Christine M. Munger and others. 

ARTICLE 7 was WITHDRAWN 

•:•',' v * ;. . •• ■*■ , i 

ARTICLE t. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to raise by 
taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or by any 
combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $64,000.00 
for the purpose of constructing a new bituminous concrete sidewalk 
with new granite curb on Lincoln Street along the easterly side 
from Lowell Street to Shawsheen Road. 

On petition of Christine M. Munger and others. 

A report from the Planning Board was made by John O'Brien. 

ARTICLE • was D EFEA TED MORE TEAM 2/3 VOTE 18 REQUIRED 

VOTES ARTICLE 8 was withdrawn by the petitioner when it was clear 
that a. 2/3 vote was lost. 



66 



SPECIAL TOWM MEETING - SEPTEMBER 30 1991 



ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, 
Article VIII of the Town Bylaws, as follows: 

(1) By adding the following tern and definition to Section II: 

MAUSOLEUM - A large tomb, usually a stone building which may 
feature an interior chapel, constructed in a cemetery, for the 
interment of the dead, above-ground. 

(2) By adding the following subsection 35(A) to Section IV. B., 
Table of Use Regulations: 

SRA SRB SRC APT SC OP GB MU IG IA ID 



BABABA NNNBANNNN 
On petition of Clifford J. Jurdi and others. 

ARTICLE 9 was WITHDRAWN 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, Section IV of the Town Zoning Bylaw, as follows: 

By adding, Accessory Uses Subsection "36A". 

Section IV. 

Accessory Uses: 

Residence Business Industrial 

36A. SRA SRB SRC APT SC OP GB MU IG IA ID 
Y Y Y YNNNNNNN 

36A. Not more than one (1) 

unregistered motor vehicle 
per residential lot. This 
section shall not apply 
to agricultural vehicles in 
use on an operating farm. 

On petition of Dennis A. Teves and others. 

A report by the Planning Board was given by Susan Stott. 

Article 10 was moved as printed in the Warrant. 

An amendment was offered "to delete the following from the Zoning 
By-law, IV. B. 29. (f) in its entirety: The one unregistered or 
non working motor vehicle permitted shall be stored so that it is 
not visible from any way or from any residential property which 
abuts the lot on which the motor vehicle is stored." 

The amendment was disallowed by the Moderator on advise from Town 
Counsel as being an improper amendment as it was out of the scope 
of the original warrant article. 



67 



SPECIAL TOWM MEETIWO - SEPTEMBER 30. 1991 

Upon notion Bade and duly seconded it was VOTED to amend Article 
10 by adding the words "but roadworthy" between the words 
"unregistered motor vehicle". 

VOTOt YB8l 244 KOt 224 PX8SBD BY A MAJORITY VOTE 

ARTICLE 10 AS AMBVDSD WAS DEFEATED 

YOTBt YB8I 257 HOt 233 MORE TEAM 2/3 VOTB REQUIRED 

Upon notion made by Town Counsel Urbellis and duly seconded it was 
VOTED to dissolve the September 30, 1991 Special Town Meeting AT 
8:55 P.M.. 

ATTEST 



-fcir><6i^^~f«2" i <Jfrt- J 



Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



68 



BORROWING CAPACITY OF THE TOWN 
12-31-91 



STATE EQUALIZED VALUATION 



3,436,701,000.00 



BORROWING CAPACITY 5% 



171,835,050.00 



TOWN DEBT 12-31-91 



20,015,000.00 



OUTSIDE THE DEBT LIMIT 
1975-WEST ANDOVER SEWER 
1976-WATER 
1982-SCHOOLS 
1984-WATER 
1986-WATER 
1 987-WATER 

1988-WATER TREATMENT PLANT 
1989-WATER TREATMENT PLANT 
1990-WATER TREATMENT PLANT 

DEBT INSIDE DEBT LIMIT 
1976-CONSERVATION LAND 
1984-PARKING FACILITY 
1984-TOWN HALL 
1986-SEWER 
1986-RIVER ROAD 
1986-LAND ACQUISITION 
1987-SEWER 

1988-SCHOOL COMPUTERS 
1989-SCHOOL COMPUTERS 
1989-LAND ACQUISITION 
1989-SEWER 
1990-SEWER 
1990-LAND ACQUISITION 
1990-SCHOOL COMPUTERS 
1990-HIGH SCHOOL ROOF 

BORROWING CAPACITY 



460,000.00 

180,000.00 
1,300,000.00 

600,000.00 
3,350,000.00 

140,000.00 
1 ,200,000.00 
4,097,500.00 

925,750.00 



160,000.00 
250,000.00 
225,000.00 
3,220,000.00 
575,000.00 
350,000.00 
175,000.00 
0.00 
187,500.00 
268,000.00 
272,000.00 
854,650.00 
763,500.00 
150,000.00 
311,100.00 



12,253,250.00 



7,761,750.00 
164,070,300.00 



LEASES 
1984-TOWN HALL 
1985-TOWN HALL 
1987-LIBRARY 
1990-TOWN HALL 
1990-LIBRARY 



150,450.00 
1,910,000.00 

540,000.00 
2,490,000.00 
3,840,000.00 



DEBT 
LEASES 
VOTED NOT 
BONDED 



TOTAL DEBT 

20,015,000.00 
8,930,450.00 
6.161,837.00 



8,930,450.00 



TOTAL 



35,107,287.00 



69 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

REVENUE 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30. 1 991 

GROUP I 

INCLUDED IN ASSESSOR'S ESTIMATES 

1991 
ACTUAL REVENUE 

DISTRIBUTIONS AND REIMBURSEMENTS FROM STATE 4,490,521.19 

MOTOR VEHICLE & TRAILER EXCISE TAXES 2,21 6.050.31 

HOTEL/MOTEL TAX 517.135.00 

LICENSES 139.177.02 

FINES 304.080.25 

SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS 86.104.01 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 87,136.40 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS & PROPERTY 553,867.00 

HEALTH AND SANITATION 82,562.94 

SCHOOL 9.995.14 

RECREATION 307,731 .76 

PUBLIC SERVICE ENTERPRISE 4,312,322.28 

CEMETERIES 13.020.00 

UBRARIES 112,904.03 

INTEREST 483,649.40 



13,716.256.73 



GROUP II 
OTHER ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 

TAX TITLE REDEMPTIONS 36.61 4.64 

TAX TITLE COSTS 21 .90 

RESTITUTION OF DAMAGES 60.00 

BID DEPOSITS 290.00 

RENTAL OF TOWN PROPERTY 54.343.06 
DEPARTMENTAL REIMBURSEMENTS ' 1.517,196.18 

IN UEU OF TAXES 2.01 6.00 

SALE OF SURPLUS EQUIPMENT 299.12 

MISCELLANEOUS ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 71 ,556.85 

PETTY CASH 1 ,475.00 

STATE REIMBURSEMENT 3.180.00 

FEDERAL REIMBURSEMENT 12.505.00 



1,699.557.75 



70 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

REVENUE 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1 991 

GROUP III 

AGENCY AND REVENUE ACCOUNTS 



1991 
ACTUAL REVENUE 



PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES 

REAL ESTATE TAXES 

TRUST FUND 

MATURITIES OF INVESTMENTS 

PAYROLL DEDUCTIONS 

TAIUNGS 

FEDERAL REVENUE SHARING 

ENTITLEMENTS 

INVESTMENT INCOME 
SEWER RATES 

SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM -ELDERLY 
SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM -STATE 
SCHOOL AID 
TOWN GRANTS 
DOG LICENSES TO COUNTY 
SALE OF DOGS 
FISHING LICENSES TO STATE 
WETLAND FEES 
OFF STREET PARKING METERS 
SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM 
ATHLETIC PROGRAM 
MUSIC DEPARTMENT USER FEES 
CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARES 
CEMETERY SALE OF LOTS 
CEMETERY FLOWER FUNDS 
COUNCIL ON AGING REVOLVING 
POLICE OFF DUTY DETAILS 
FIRE OFF DUTY DETAILS 
SALE OF TRASH BAGS 
GUARANTEE DEPOSITS 
MEALS TAXES 

INSURANCE CLAIM REFUNDS 
CH 71 SEC 71 E CUSTODIAL 
BOND ANTICIPATION NOTES 
TEMPORARY LOAN -FED AID 
BOND ISSUE PROCEEDS 
REVENUE ANTICIPATION LOANS 
ACCRUED INTEREST ON BOND PROCEEDS 
PREMIUM ON BONDING PROCEEDS 



GRAND TOTAL 



0.00 

8,722.61 
112,970.15 



6,920.00 

42.00 

12,772.75 

0.00 

66,789.45 

514,720.97 

50.264.63 

3,746.40 

27,145.00 

13.585.00 

1 .570.30 

125.949.50 

422.453.35 

4.066.50 

0.00 

30.000.00 

1,361.96 

5,669.79 

33.460.16 

704.000.00 

1.834.000.00 

3.255.000.00 

900.000.00 

7,432.42 

93.30 



670.780.95 

37.968.864.94 

664.000.71 

18.734.255.26 

7.187,229.95 

18,520.60 



0.00 
2.341,448.06 

121,692.76 
423,327.83 
528,953.77 



823,506.00 



457,881.81 



6,739,655.67 



76,680,118.31 
92.095,932.79 



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75 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET 
JUNE 30, 1991 





GENERAL 


CAPITAL 


SPECIAL 


LONG-TERM 


GRAND TOTAL 




FUND 


PROJECT 


REVENUE 


OBLIGATIONS 




ASSETS 












Cash and Equivelants 


1.370,504.61 


1.450.060.11 


555.414.58 




3.385.870.30 


Accounts Recievables: 












Property Taxes 


2.288.213 14 








2.268.213.14 


Excise Taxas 


201,508.22 








201,508.22 


Watar & Sawar Charges 


012.517.08 








012.517.08 


Tax Lians 


1,315.415.88 








1.315,415.88 


Departmental Revenue 


56.860.31 








56,860.31 


Spaciai Assassmants 


618.025.31 








618.025.31 


Qua from other Governments 


004.105.34 


0.00 


450.025.02 




1.364.121.26 


Total Cash & Raciavablas 


7.737,330.70 


1,450.060.11 


1.015.340.50 


0.00 


10.212.631.40 


Other Assats 












Tax Possassions 


67.408.27 








67.408.27 


Amounts to ba Provided for : 












Bond Anticipation Notas Payabla 


0.00 


1.420.000.00 


107.000.00 




1.626,000.00 


Long Term Obligations 


0.00 






31.675.450.00 


31.675,450.00 


Total Assats 


7.804.730.06 


2.888.960.11 


1.212,340.50 


31.675.450.00 


43.581.489.67 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 
Accruad Payroll Withholdings 
Reserve for Abatements 
Dafarrad Revenue 
Unclaimed Itams 

Excass on Salas of Low Valua Land 
Guarantaa Deposits 
Bond Anticipation Notas 
Bonds Payabla- Insida Dabt Limit 
Bonds Payabla- Outside Debt Limit 
Lease Obligations 

Total Liabilities 



(80.835.66) (80.835.66) 

(346.583.85) (346.583.85) 

(5.112.311.33) 0.00 (450.025.92) (5.572.237.25) 

(62.320.50) (62.320.50) 

(4.305.74) (4,305.74) 

(38,066.80) (38.966.80) 

0.00 (1.429.000.00) (197.000.00) (1.626.000.00) 

0.00 (0,788.750.00) (0.788.750.00) 

0.00 (12.236.250.00) (12.236.250.00) 

0.00 (9.650.450.00) (9.650.450.00) 



(5.654.323.88) 



(1.429.000.00) 



(656.925.92) (31.675.450.00) (30,415.609.80) 



Fund Balances 








Unreserved 


(899.380.19) 


(0.30) 


(506.604.65) 


Reserved for: 








Continued Appropriations 


(178.387.27) 


(1.414.804.70) 


0.00 


Encumbrances 


(1.632.200.32) 


(45.065.11) 


(48.442.57) 


Designated for: 








Over/Under Assessments 


(0.029.00) 






Unprovided for Abates & Exempts 


520.415.60 






Court Judgements 


40.155.01 







Total Fund Balances 



Total Liab. & Fund Balance 



(1,405.985.14) 

(1.593.281.97) 
(1,725.798.00) 

(9.929.00) 
520.415.60 
40.155.01 



(2.150.415.18) 


(1,450.060.11) 


(555.047.22) 


0.00 


(4.165.422.51) 


(7.804,730.06) 


(2.888.060.11) 


(1.211,073.14) 


(31,675.450.00) 


(43,581.122.31) 



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81 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

EXPENDITURES FOR AGENCY AND MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNTS 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1991 



Employees' Payroll Deductions 

State Grants 

Refunds: 

Real Estate Taxes 

Personal Property Taxes 

Motor Vehicle Taxes 

Water Rates and Services 

Sewer Charges 

Interest and Demands 

Parking Tickets 

Miscellaneous 
Petty Cash 

Off-duty Work Details 
Miscellaneous Trust Funds 
Merrimack Valley Library Consortium 
Cemetery Perpetual Care Funds 
Unemployment Compensation 
Insurance Fund 
Fishing Licenses to State 
Walter Raymond Fund 
Lucy Shaw Fund 
Police Department Drug Abuse 
Investment Funds 
Temporary Borrowing 
School Lunch Program: 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses 
Andover Athletic Program 
Music Revolving 
Student Teachers Revolving 
Community ASK Revolving 
Chapter 71 Sec 71 E 
Council on Aging 
Tailings 
Meals Taxes 
Tax Title Expenses 
Chapter 90 Funds 
Community Garden Project 
Frontage Road 
Fireworks (Gifts) 
SHED Contribution 
TOT Lot 

Old Town Hall Restoration 
Court Judgements 
Guarantee Deposits 
Miscellaneous 



7,084.791.17 
639,473.93 



937,454.28 

16.470.14 

35,416.07 

4,881.16 

1 .335.54 

28.11 

45.00 

14.145.75 



12.100.75 

68.61 

2.374.29 

1.340.00 



360,014.89 
282.808.75 



1 ,009,776.05 

1.475.00 

425.135.30 

47.951.89 

455.838.70 

37,840.00 

57.132.46 

32.064.22 



15,883.65 

20,798,465.66 

6.882,000.00 



642.823.64 

42.980.49 

3.377.17 

746.67 

4.376.53 

2.319.60 

26.969.18 

44.42 

1.403.82 

17.983.38 

52.819.15 

989.97 

21.485.62 

6.000.00 

5.028.04 

1.364.31 

3,408.85 

40.155.91 

6,382.15 

1,104.602.77 

39.473,089.70 



82 



ARTICLE 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

ANALYSIS OF LONG TERM DEBT AUTHORIZED 

JUNE 30. 1991 

PROJECT NAME 



AUTHORIZATION 



ART 43. 1 982 RIVERINA ROAD 



ART 21 . 1 984 RIVERINA ROAD PLANT EXPANSION 



ART 1 A. 1 987 WATER TREAT PLANT EXPANSION 



ART 18. 1985 SEWER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS 



ART 37. 1 987 WATER MAIN CONSTRUCTION 



ART 20, 1 989 SHED TEMPORARY CLASSROOMS 



ART 25. 1 989 ANDOVER HIGH SCHOOL ROOF 



ART 28. 1 989 SEWER - LOWELL ST/WEST PARISH DR 



ART 31 . 1 989 ENGINEERING SPECS 



ART 32. 1 989 STORM DRAINS 



ART 33. 1 989 SEWER -NORTH STREET 



ART 46. 1 990 TRAFFIC SIGNAL FRONTAGE/DASCOMB 



ART 41 . 1 991 NORTH STREET SEWER 



ART 43. 1 991 STORM DRAINS 



1 .000.000.00 

866,837.00 

6,950,000.00 

1.160,000.00 

1 .300,000.00 

150.000.00 

150,000.00 

90,000.00 

500.000.00 

100,000.00 

190,000.00 

110,000.00 

280.000.00 

325.000.00 

13.171,837.00 



83 




''^T iii ' .Ti T^" 



DIRECTORY OF TOWN OFFICIALS 
AS OF DECEMBER 31. 1991 

ELECTIVE 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Gerald H. Silverman, Ch. - 1992 

Charles H. Wesson, Jr. - 1992 

William T. Downs - 1993 

James M. Barenboim • 1994 

Larry L Larsen • 1994 



SCHOOL COMMTrrEE 

Christopher M. Outwin.Ch. - 1993 
Susan T. Dalton • 1994 

Susan E. Jenkins - 1994 

Clifford Scott • 1992 

Richard L Hubbell - 1992 



TOWN MODERATOR 

James D. Doherty • 1992 

TRUSTEES. frauFii ninn 

Alcide J. Legendre 
John J. Williams 
Edwin F. Reidel 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORTTY 

Mary Jane Powell, Ch. - 1993 
Ronald C. Hajj, V. Ch. - 1994 

Eleen M. Connolly, Treas. • 1994 
John P. Hess • 1995 

Hartley M. Burn ham* ■ 1996 

'Appointed by Commissioner 
of Dept. of Comm. Affairs. 



REGIONAL SCHOOL COMMfTTEE 

Joseph Gleason, Andover 
Terrence L Breen, Methuen 
Thomas L Groedine, Methuen 
Leo L LaMontagne, Lawrence 
Francis J. McLaughlin, Lawrence 
Evelyn A. Burke, Lawrence 
John J. Caffrey, No. Andover 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARP 
FREE SCHOOL 

Earl G. Efinger • 1994 
Joan M. Lewis 
John R. Petty 
Robert A. Finlayson 
Donna C. Ellsworth 
Reverend Joseph W. LaDu 
Reverend Calvin F. Mutti 
Reverend James A. Diamond 



APPOINTIVE 

TOWN MANAGER - Reginald S. Stapczynski 
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS - Dr. Mark K. McQuillan 



FINANCE 

Donald W. Robb, Ch. 
Joanne F. Marden 
Frederic A. Stott 
Peter J. Volpe 
John J. Dwyer 
Frederick P. Fitzgerald 
Edward A. Weil 
Virginia S. Keaton 
Donald F. Schroeder 

PLANNING BOARD 

John D. O'Brien, Ch. 
Susan G. Stott 
Cart J. Byers 
Mariann Lombard! 
Hooks K Johnston, Jr. 

TRUSTEES. MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

Patricia H. Edmonds, Ch. 
Maria A. Rizzo 
Joseph A Glasser 
Karen M. Herman 
Margaret I. Jurgen 
Thomas J. Swift 
Melissa Morris Danisch 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

C. Ryan Buckley, Ch. 
Pamela H. Mitchell 
Paul Bevacqua 
Daniel S. Casper 
Carol C. McDonough 

Associate Members: 

Jane E. Griswold 

Peter F. Reilly 

Alan R. Shulman 

John F. Bradley, II 

BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

John R. Williams 
Wendell A Mattheson 
Robert R. Schmidt 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Robert A. Pusteli. Ch. 
Donald D. Cooper 
Phillip F. Wormwood 
Scott Matsumoto 
Mark S. Curtin 
Judith M. Chupasko 
James M. Marsh 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

William J. Krajeski 
Archibald D. Maclaren 
Anthony J. Torrisi 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Dr. Douglas Dunbar 
Dr. Stephen H. Loring 
John R. Kruse 



TOWLEFUND 

Phillip F. Sullivan 
Ruth E. Westcott 
Marilyn R. Brody 

G.L SANITARY DISTRICT 

Robert E. McQuade 



DESIGN ADVISORY COMM. 

Thomas P. McCleam, Ch. 
Nancy B. McBride 
Ellen A Zpeto 
Christopher S. Doherty 
Donald J. Harding 



84 



INDUSTRIAL DEV. FINANCING AUTH 

Dr. Lawrence S. Spiegel 
Michael W. Morris 
Thomas J. Swift 
Paul W. Cronin 
Robert A. Finlayson 

DEVELOPMENT & INDUS. COMM. 

Dr. Lawrence S. Spiegel 
Robert A. Finlayson 
Thomas J. Swift 
Paul W. Cronin 
S. Joseph Hoffman 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John S. Sullivan 

Ellen A. ZJpeto 

Joel C. Claydon 

Karen M. Herman 

Norma A. Gammon 

Philip K. Allen • Ch. Emeritus 



COMMITTEE ON TOWN TRUST FUNDS 

Andrew A. Shea 
Myron H. Muise 
Robert A. Henderson 

TRUSTEES OF SPRING 
GROVE CEMETERY 

Gilbert J. Cromie 
Charles A. Bergeron 
Paul W. Cronin 
Rebecca A. Backman 
Irving J. Whitcomb 
Lawrence J. Hesinius, Jr. 

MERRIMACK van FY pi & NNING COMMISSION 

Dr. Lawrence S. Spiegel 



RETIREMENT BOARD 

William T. Downs 
Mary K. Lyman 
Rodney P. Smith 

ANDOVER ARTS COUNCIL 
Ron Wackowskl 
Ruth N. Ruskin 
Teresa Morgan 
Margaret A. Pustell 
John F. ZJpeto 
Katharine Hoffman 
Diane Pftochelli 



CABLE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Annetta R. Freedman 

John R. Dempsey 

Barbara Worcester 

James P. Murphy 

James M. Lyman 



PATRIOTIC HOLIDAY/ 

SIHhfcl OF FLAGS COMMITTEE 

John J. Lewis 

Richard J. Bowen 

John C. Doherty 

Harold F. Hayes 

John Milne 

Edward J. Morrissey 

James M. Bamford 

Robert M. Henderson 

William C. MacKenzie 

James Deyermond 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

Thomas F. Powers 
Helen A. Watkinson 
William T. Ryan 
Dorothy L Bresnahan 
William L Lane 
Oscar Rosenberg 
Doreen CorrentJ 
Paul L Twomey 
Robert P. Kenney 
Doris Hudgins 
William Mueller 
Arthur W. Smith 



WATER CONSERVAnON OOMMTTg 

David E. Bales 

Albert Robbat, Jr. 

Charles F. Dalton, Jr. 

Mary Clark Webster 

C. Joyce Ringleb 

Katharine E. Kloss 

Richard J. Bowen 

Robert E. McQuade • Ex Officio 

SHED BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Paul Finger 

Lois Karfunkel 

Molly Marsh 

Judy Rogers 

Kim Yoshida 

ANDOVER HOUSMG PARTNERSHP/ 
FAIR HOUSING COMMITTEE 
Carl J. Byers 
David Hastings 
Christopher D. Haynes 
Lorene A. Comeau 



UNITED STATES SENATORS 

Edward M. Kennedy, 1702 P.O. Bldg., Boston 
John Kerry, 2003 JFK Federal Bldg., Boston 

SECOND ESSEX AND MIDDLESEX DISTRICT 

Patricia McGovern - 74 Saunders St., Lawrence 

SEVENTEENTH ESSEX DISTRICT REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

Gary M. Coon, 27 Korinthlan Way, Andover 

FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 

Chester Atkins, 134 Middle St., Lowell 

FIFTH COUNCILOR DISTRICT 

John P. Harris, 31 Lincoln Circle, Andover 



85 



DIRECTORY OF DEPARTMENT HEADS AS OF DECEMBER 31. 1991 



Animal Inspector Richard D. Lindsay, D.V.M. 

Civil Defense Director James F. Johnson 

Community Development Department 

Director of Health Everett F. Penney 

Inspector of Buildings Sam J. DeSalvo 

Director of Planning Stephen L Colyer 

Electrical Inspector Richard J. Salenas 

Plumbing, Gas & Sewer Inspector Bruce P. Hale 

Council On Aging Mary A. Byrne 

Finance and Budget Director Anthony J. Torrisi 

Chief Assessor William J. Krajeski 

Collector/Treasurer Myron H. Muise 

Data Processing Manager Barbara D. Morache 

Purchasing Agent John W. Aulson 

Veterans Service Agent John J. Lewis 

Fire Chief Harold F. Hayes 

Game Warden Forrest H. Noyes, Jr. 

Deputy Game Warden James W. Deyermond 

Deputy Game Warden Eugene A. Zalla 

Housing Authority Executive Director Nancy M. Marcoux 

Municipal Maintenance Director Frederick L Jaeschke 

Building Superintendent Kenneth H. Parker 

Forester (Cemetery, Forestry, Parks) James M. Bamford 

PHE/Vehicle Maint. Superintendent James J. Brightney 

Police Chief James F. Johnson 

Dog Officer Wayne D. Nader 

Public Works Director Robert E. McQuade 

Highway Superintendent John F. Canavan, Jr. 

Town Engineer John Avery, Jr. 

Memorial Hall Libiary Director Nancy C. Jacobson 

Town Accountant Rodney P. Smith 

Town Clerk Randall L Hanson 

Town Counsel Thomas J. Urbelis 



86 



INDEX 



Animal Control 18 

Animal Inspection 19 

Board of Selectmen 3 

Civil Defense 18 

Community Dev. & Planning 33 

Building Division 33 

Conservation 34 

Electrical Inspection 33 

Health Division 35 

Planning Division 38 

Plumbing & Gas Inspection 34 

Zoning Board 39 

Community Services 20 

Council on Aging 20 

Directory of Town Officials 84 

Directory of Department Heads 86 

Finance & Budget 5 

Assessors 8 

Central Purchasing 7 

Collector/Treasurer 9 

Data Processing 7 

Veterans Services 13 

Financial Statements 69 

Fire Department 15 

Game Warden 19 

Greater Lawrence Tech. School 21 



Greater Lawrence Sanitary District 32 

Historical Commission 26 

Housing Authority 39 

John Cornell Wood & Coal Fund 14 

Margaret G. Towle Fund 14 

Memorial Hall Library 13 

Municipal Maintenance 27 

Building 27 

Forestry 29 

Parks 28 

Plumbing, Heating & Electrical 28 

Spring Grove Cemetery 29 

Vehicle Maintenance 29 

Police Department 17 

Public Works Department 30 

Engineering 30 

Highway 31 

Sewer 32 

Water 31 

Recycling 32 

Town Clerk 4 

Town Counsel 14 

Town Manager 1 

Town Meeting Minutes 42 

Trustees Punchard Free School 23